UPDATE: Senate to consider wrongful conviction payment

UPDATED Tuesday, April 1, 2014 --- 11:03 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The state Senate is set to vote a bill that would funnel more money to a man wrongfully convicted of homicide.

Robert Lee Stinson was convicted in 1985 of killing a Milwaukee woman. A judge freed him in 2009 after the Wisconsin Innocence Project argued bite-mark analysis and DNA evidence didn't match evidence from the scene.

The state Claims Board gave Stinson $25,000, the maximum allowed under state law, in 2010 but recommended the state give him another $90,000.

The Senate passed a bill in November that would give Stinson $136,000. The Assembly scaled that back to $90,000 in March. The Senate is set to take up that version of the measure on Tuesday.

Approval would send the bill to Gov. Scott Walker.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, March 18, 2014 --- 6:24 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Assembly has approved more money for a man who was wrongfully convicted of homicide.

Robert Lee Stinson was convicted in 1985 of killing a Milwaukee woman. A judge freed him in 2009 after the Wisconsin Innocence Project argued bite-mark analysis and DNA evidence didn't match evidence from the scene.

Stinson asked for $129,000 in compensation. The state Claims Board awarded him $25,000, the maximum allowed under state law, in 2010, but recommended the state give him another $90,000.

Republicans and Democrats introduced a bill in August that would give Stinson the extra money. The Senate passed the measure in November but amended it to give Stinson $136,000.

The Assembly passed the $90,000 version of the bill 96-3 Tuesday.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATE Tuesday, March 18, 2014 --- 6:45 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Assembly is set to consider giving more money to a man who was wrongfully convicted of homicide.

Robert Lee Stinson was convicted in 1985 of killing a Milwaukee woman. A judge freed him in 2009 after the Wisconsin Innocence Project argued bite-mark analysis and DNA evidence didn't match evidence from the crime scene.

Stinson asked for $129,000 in compensation. The state Claims Board awarded him $25,000, the maximum allowed under state law, in 2010, but recommended the state give him another $90,000.

Republicans and Democrats introduced a bill in August that would give Stinson the extra money. The Senate passed the measure in November but amended it to give Stinson $136,000.

The Assembly is set to take up the bill on Tuesday.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, November 5, 2013 --- 6:01 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Senate has approved a bill that would increase compensation for a wrongfully convicted man.

Robert Lee Stinson spent 23 years in prison for a Milwaukee homicide he didn't commit.

Stinson asked the state claims board for $115,000, or $5,000 for every year he spent behind bars, as well as $14,000 in attorney fees. The board awarded him $25,000, the maximum compensation under state law. The board recommended state pay him another $90,000.

The bipartisan bill would pay Stinson the additional $90,000 from the state's general fund. Sen. Glenn Grothman introduced an amendment bumping that up to $136,000, saying he thought Stinson deserved more.

The Senate approved the amendment on a voice vote and the bill 33-0 Tuesday. The measure now goes to the Assembly.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, November 5, 2013 --- 1:50 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Senate has approved a bill that would increase compensation for a wrongfully convicted man.

Robert Lee Stinson spent 23 years in prison for a Milwaukee homicide he didn't commit.

Stinson asked the state claims board for $115,000, or $5,000 for every year he spent behind bars, as well as $14,000 in attorney fees. The board awarded him $25,000, the maximum compensation under state law. The board recommended state pay him another $90,000 to get him to $115,000.

The bipartisan bill would pay Stinson the additional $90,000 from the state's general fund. Sen. Glenn Grothman introduced an amendment bumping that up to $136,000. He offered no explanation.

The Senate approved the amendment on a voice vote and the bill 33-0 Tuesday. The measure now goes to the Assembly.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Posted Tuesday, November 5, 2013 --- 5:52 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Senate is set to consider a bill that would increase compensation for a wrongfully convicted man.

Robert Lee Stinson was convicted in a 1984 slaying of a Milwaukee woman. He spent 23 years in prison before his conviction was overturned, partly because bite marks on the body didn't match Stinson's teeth.

Stinson asked the state claims board for $115,000, or $5,000 for every year he spent behind bars, as well as $14,000 in attorney fees.

The board awarded him $25,000, the maximum compensation for a wrongful conviction under state law. The board recommended state pay him another $90,000 to get him to $115,000.

The bipartisan bill would pay Stinson the additional $90,000 from the state's general fund.

The Senate is expected to take up the bill Tuesday.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


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