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UPDATE: Ryan says Obama's Syria strategy not credible


UPDATED Friday, September 13, 2013 --- 2:08 p.m.

BROOKFIELD, Wis. (AP) -- U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan is tearing into President Barack Obama's strategy on Syria, calling it an "embarrassing spectacle" that has hurt the country's credibility.

The Republican Ryan expanded on his opposition to Obama's approach on Syria in response to a question posed following his speech Friday to a business group in Brookfield outside of Milwaukee.

Ryan says he had been "biting my tongue all week" to give Obama time to lay out his plan and brief Congress. But Ryan says now that that has been done, he doesn't believe Obama has made the case for a military strike.

Ryan says, "I do not think the president has presented anything close to a coherent strategy."

Obama has moved from emphasizing a military strike to seeking a diplomatic solution in Syria.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, September 11, 2013 --- 9:56 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan says he opposes President Barack Obama's plan on Syria, adding to the deterioration of support in Congress for military strikes.

The Republican Ryan issued a statement on Wednesday saying a military strike would make things worse and damage the United States' credibility. Ryan hadn't taken a firm position previously on Obama's plans.

Ryan says events this week have reinforced the U.S.'s credibility gap on the issue and he says Obama lacks a clear strategy and is following Russia's lead.

In an address to the nation Tuesday night, Obama conditionally endorsed a Russian offer for international inspectors to seize and destroy deadly chemical weapons in Syria. He also asked Congress to delay a vote on a resolution authorizing limited military strikes.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 --- 9:30pm

President Obama is asking the public and US Congress to support military strikes on Syria But, he admits, it's going to be a tough sell.

Tuesday night, the president addressed the American people.

He say his decision to support a strike comes after the Assad regime's attack in Syria on August 21. Over a thousand people were gassed to death, including hundreds of children. The president calls the attack a "danger to our security." He says if the US fails to act, the Assad regime will continue to use chemical weapons.

A major concern by many Americans is whether US involvement will lead to war.

"I will not put American boots on the ground in Syria. I will not pursue an open-ended action like Iraq or Afghanistan. I will not pursue a prolonged air campaign like Libya or Kosovo. This would be a targeted strike to achieve a clear objective” says President Obama.

Many weighed in on the president's speech on the NBC 15 Facebook fanpage. Responses were mixed.

Duaine writes “I love the speech. Chemical warfare is not accepted and should never be taken lightly."

But, Jessica is against a strike. She writes "We are potentially being set up for World War III."

Meanwhile others are on the fence. Pam writes “We should not be the world's police, but we can't stand by and do nothing.”

For now, President Obama is asking Congress to postpone a vote to authorize the use of force, to see if a diplomatic option can work instead.

You can weigh in on the issue on our Facebook page by clicking here:
https://www.facebook.com/#!/NBC15Madison

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UPDATED Tuesday, September 10, 2013 --- 1:17 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- U.S. Rep. Reid Ribble says he would vote against taking military action in Syria.

The Wisconsin Republican previously had been leaning away from military action. He said in a statement Tuesday that after receiving more information, his position had become more firm and he would vote "no" on any authorization of military force if it were presented in the House of Representatives.

President Barack Obama asked Congress to authorize a military strike on Syria after intelligence reports that the Assad's government used chemical weapons against its own people.

Syria has since accepted a proposal from Russia, its most powerful ally, to give up its chemical weapons stockpile.

Rep. Tom Petri's office said earlier Tuesday that he was now leaning away from a military strike. Petri also is from Wisconsin.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, September 10, 2013 --- 11:27 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- U.S. Rep. Tom Petri's office says the congressman is now leaning away from a military strike on Syria.

The Wisconsin Republican had been undecided on the issue.

Petri said in a statement released Tuesday that he doesn't think the U.S. has exhausted all other options. He says if Syrian President Bashar Assad is willing to work with inspectors and hand over chemical weapons, that's a good sign.

But Petri also says he believes in the saying "trust, but verify," and he's waiting to see if the Syrian government follows through on its promises.

President Barack Obama asked Congress to authorize a military strike on Syria after intelligence reports that the Assad's government used chemical weapons against its own people.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, September 5, 2013 --- 9:15 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson says too many questions about possible military action in Syria remain for him to support it right now.

Johnson voted in committee Wednesday against authorizing limited use of U.S. armed forces against Syria. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee, however, approved the resolution in a 10-7 vote.

The Republican said in a statement that the vote was taken only 25 hours after formal hearings began and so many questions remained that he "could not even consider voting `yes."'

Johnson says President Barack Obama must show why military action in Syria is in the U.S.'s national security interest. He says he will keep an open mind until he casts his final vote.

A vote in the full Senate could come next week.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, September 4, 2013 --- 8:33 p.m.

Wis. Senator Ron Johnson voted against the authorization of force against the Syrian government today. He was in the minority of a 10-7 vote of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

In a statement, Johnson said "There were so many unanswered questions that I could not even consider voting 'yes.' It is unfortunate that a matter of such gravity was so inappropriately rushed."

The current resolution would limit a response to less than three weeks without ground troops. It could head to the full Senate for vote next week.

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UPDATED Wednesday, September 4, 2013 --- 5:30 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Wisconsin Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner says he will vote against a military strike against Syria because it won't help the Syrian people.

The U.S. has accused Syrian President Bashar Assad of using chemical weapons against his people, and President Barack Obama has asked Congress to authorize a military strike.

Congress could vote on the matter next week.

Sensenbrenner said in a statement Wednesday that he would vote no. The Republican says Obama's plan for a strike "will not help the Syrian people or promote the freedom or security of the United States."

Sensenbrenner's district includes suburbs west of Milwaukee.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, September 4, 2013 --- 4:42 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Wisconsin Rep. Sean Duffy says he won't support a resolution for military intervention in Syria.

The U.S. has accused Syrian President Bashar Assad of using chemical weapons against his own people, and President Barack Obama has asked Congress to authorize a military strike.

Duffy said in a statement Wednesday that Obama did the right thing by seeking Congressional approval, but he didn't think the president had outlined a coherent plan to justify military action.

Duffy, a Republican, represents northern Wisconsin.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Posted Wednesday, September 4, 2013 --- 11:50 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Members of Wisconsin's congressional delegation are largely undecided about whether the U.S. should take military action in Syria.

The U.S. and France have accused President Bashar Assad of using chemical weapons against his own people, and President Barack Obama has asked Congress to authorize a military strike.

Wisconsin Rep. Ron Kind says he is undecided after hearing White House briefings and talking to residents in his district. Kind says most people he has spoken with are not eager for what they fear could become another long military engagement in the Middle East.

But Kind says not taking action also sends a message to Assad and that could be the wrong message.

Other members of Wisconsin's delegation also say they need to see more evidence before making a decision.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


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