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UPDATE: More Than Three Dozen People Killed In Sandy

UPDATED Wednesday, October 31, 2012 --- 7:50 a.m.

A state-by-state look at the East Coast superstorm

The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, killing at least 55 people in the United States. Power outages now stand at more than 6.5 million homes and businesses, down from a peak of 8.5 million. Here's a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

CONNECTICUT

Widespread damage to homes on Long Island Sound. Deaths: 3. Power outages: 475,000, down from a peak of more than 620,000.

DELAWARE

Some southern coastal areas remain underwater, but officials say the damage is far less than anticipated. Power outages: 7,400, down from more than 45,000.

ILLINOIS

High waves and flooding are possible on the Lake Michigan shore on Wednesday in Chicago.

KENTUCKY

As much as a foot of snow fell in higher elevations of Appalachian Kentucky.

MAINE

Port of Portland reopened, but ocean conditions remain dangerous with high winds. Power outages: More than 16,000, down from more than 90,000.

MARYLAND

Eastern Maryland cleaned up from storm surge, while western Maryland dealt with as much as 29 inches of snow. Dueling disasters are straining emergency resources. Deaths: 2. Power outages: About 299,100, down from 290,000.

MASSACHUSETTS

Continued cleanup from fallen trees and damage to homes and businesses, but relief that storm wasn't worse. Many schools remained closed. Power outages: 106,000, down from 400,000.

MICHIGAN

Cargo shipping on the Great Lakes is at a standstill because of waves of up to 20 feet. Power outages: 40,600, down from more than 150,000.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

A construction worker checking on a job site in Lincoln was killed in a landslide. Deaths: 1. Power outages: 81,000, down from 210,000.

NEW JERSEY

Fires that destroyed several homes in a shore town rekindled, fueled by natural gas. National Guard arrived to evacuate residents of Hoboken and distribute supplies. Storm renewed debate about whether to rebuild shoreline sand dunes. Deaths: 6. Power outages: 2.1 million, down from 2.7 million.

NEW YORK

Traffic has choked city streets as residents try to return to work in a New York City whose subway system remains crippled. Security concerns abound at night in areas without power but the city is promising vigilance. Utilities say it could be days before power is fully restored there and on Long Island. Deaths: 29, including 22 in New York City. Power outages: 2.04 million, down from 2.2 million.

NORTH CAROLINA

The search continues off the coast for the captain of a tall ship that sank as Sandy headed north. Parts of western North Carolina are seeing continued snow. Deaths: 2. Power outages: Fewer than 400, down from 126,000.

OHIO

High winds uprooted trees in northern Ohio. Schools are closed and major commuter arteries along Lake Erie have flooded. Deaths: 2. Power outages: 147,000, down from more than 250,000.

PENNSYLVANIA

The core of Sandy made its way north through western Pennsylvania into western New York, causing wind and flooding that closed roads. Deaths: 7. Power outages: 850,000, down from 1.2 million.

RHODE ISLAND

Residents may not be able to return to their homes for another day in some coastal communities. Power outages: About 64,000, down from more than 115,000.

TENNESSEE

A route across the Smoky Mountains has closed as heavy, wet snow accumulated to as much as 2 feet.

VERMONT

Winds have knocked down trees and power lines, and schools are closed, but damage was not as severe as feared in a state still recovering from Tropical Storm Irene. Power outages: 3,550, down from more than 10,000.

VIRGINIA

Utilities brought in crews to help restore power after high winds and snow. Deaths: 2. Power outages: about 40,000, down from more than 180,000.

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Federal and local governments have asked people to return to work Wednesday, and transit systems have resumed full service although some bus routes are dealing with detours. Power outages: About 467, down from 25,000.

WEST VIRGINIA

Some areas have been buried under more than a foot of snow. Deaths: 1. Power outages: 235,566, down from about 268,000.

WISCONSIN

Dangerously high waves and flooding are expected along Lake Michigan.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Tuesday, October 30, 2012 --- 1:19 p.m.

Click here to see pictures from nbcnews.com

NEW YORK (AP) -- It could be days before people in much of the Northeast can see their lives start to return to normal, in the aftermath of a storm that has left at least 39 people dead.

More than 8.2 million people across the East are without power. New York City was especially hard hit, its subways shut down and much of Manhattan left without power.

And it's not over yet. The storm that resulted when Hurricane Sandy merged with two other storm systems has been moving westward today across Pennsylvania with winds of 45 miles an hour. It's expected to make a turn into New York State tonight.

Although it is getting weaker as it goes, forecasters still expect it to bring heavy rain and flooding.

In one measure of the storm's size and power, waves on southern Lake Michigan have risen above 20 feet, tying a record. High winds spinning off the edges of the storm clobbered the Cleveland area early today, uprooting trees and cutting power to hundreds of thousands.

Sandy brought blizzard conditions to West Virginia and neighboring states, with more than 2 feet of snow expected in some places.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Tuesday, October 30, 2012 --- 12:35 p.m.

New York's mayor calls it a "devastating storm" -- possibly the worst the city has ever experienced.

The superstorm that was born when Hurricane Sandy came ashore killed at least 10 people in New York City -- among more than 30 who were killed across the Northeast. A wall of seawater and high winds slammed the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels.

The city was left with no running trains, a darkened business district and neighborhoods under water. Mayor Michael Bloomberg is giving no firm timeline on when basic services will be fully restored. The city had been left nearly isolated -- its bridges and tunnels closed, its subways and airports shut down. But Gov. Andrew Cuomo says most of the bridges are reopening this afternoon.

All of the subway tunnels between Manhattan and Brooklyn were flooded, as were two major commuter tunnels -- the Brooklyn Battery and the Queens Midtown. The head of the city's transit agency says the subway system has never faced a disaster like this one.

At least 1 million customers lost power in New York City, its northern suburbs and coastal Long Island. Officials say it could be several days to a week before all city residents who lost power get it back.

Tomorrow, the city's financial markets will open after being shut for two days by the storm.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Tuesday, October 30, 2012 --- 7:35 a.m.

A state-by-state look at the East Coast superstorm:

The massive storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing at least 18 deaths. Here's a snapshot of what is happening, state by state.

CAROLINAS

North Carolina Gov. Beverly Perdue expanded a state of emergency to western North Carolina, which could see a foot of snow. A woman who was pulled from the Atlantic after abandoning a tall ship died. Power outages: 6,600.

CONNECTICUT

The Long Island Sound flooded roads as the storm toppled trees and power lines Two people died, including an Easton firefighter who was killed when a tree fell on his truck. Power outages: more than 615,000.

DELAWARE

Nearly all residents of flood-prone coastal communities in Kent County heeded calls to evacuate. The Rehoboth Beach and Dewey Beach resort communities were flooded. Power outages: more than 45,000.

ILLINOIS

High wind warnings and a lakeshore flood warning are in effect Tuesday and Wednesday in Chicago. City officials say Lake Shore Drive is expected to remain open.

KENTUCKY

A winter storm warning is in effect for three southeastern counties until Wednesday. In some areas, winds could gust up to 50 mph through Tuesday.

MAINE

Wind gusts topped 60 mph, shutting down the port of Portland and knocking out power to homes and businesses. Power outages: more than 86,000.

MARYLAND

Floodwaters swamped touristy Ocean City. In western Maryland, snow tied up traffic. A falling tree killed a man in Pasadena. Power outages: 290,000.

MASSACHUSETTS

Strong winds and heavy surf led to mandatory evacuations in sections of coastal Dartmouth and Fall River and voluntary evacuations in other coastal communities. Power outages: more than 300,000.

MICHIGAN

High winds knocked out power to at least 60,000 homes and businesses.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Politicians canceled visits to the presidential swing state on Monday. Power outages: 179,000.

NEW JERSEY

The center of the storm came ashore Monday evening near Atlantic City, which was cut off from the mainland by the storm surge along with other barrier islands, stranding residents who ignored warnings to evacuate. Hundreds of people were being evacuated after a levee broke in the northern New Jersey town of Moonachie. At least three deaths were reported. Power outages: more than 2.3 million.

NEW YORK

A record storm surge that was higher than predicted along with high winds damaged the electrical system and plunged millions of people into darkness. Utilities say it could be up to a week before power is fully restored. The governor's office says there have been five storm-related deaths. A fire burned 50 houses in one flooded section of Queens. Power outages: more than 1.8 million.

OHIO

The Cleveland area and northeast Ohio are getting slammed with rain and high winds. Snow was reported in some parts south of Cleveland and south of Columbus. Power outages: more than 250,000.

PENNSYLVANIA

Wind and flooding closing more than 200 bridges and roads. Four people have died, including an 8-year-old boy who was killed when a tree limb fell on him. Power outages: 1.2 million.

RHODE ISLAND

Howling winds and storm surge forced mandatory and voluntary evacuations in low-lying and coastal communities. Providence's hurricane barrier performed well in one of its biggest tests. Power outages: 115,000.

TENNESSEE

Snow expected in higher elevations, where a freeze warning has been issued. High winds expected in many areas.

VERMONT

Winds knocked down trees and power lines, and schools were closed. Power outages: more than 10,000.

VIRGINIA

Utilities brought in crews to help restore power after high winds and snow. A curfew was ordered yesterday on Chincoteague Island. Power outages: more than 131,000.

WASHINGTON, D.C.

Federal and local governments will remain closed Tuesday along with the courts, public schools and the Metro system that serves 1.2 million weekday customers. Widespread cancellations are expected at the region's three major airports. Power outages: 25,000.

WEST VIRGINIA

Some areas are buried under more than a foot of snow. A woman was killed in a traffic crash. Power outages: more than 128,000.

WISCONSIN

A village along Lake Michigan has suggested residents evacuate this morning because of the possibility of dangerously high waves and flooding.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.


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