NBC15 WMTV | Madison, WI | News, Weather, Sports

UPDATE: Fed court upholds injunction on Wis. abortion law


UPDATED Friday, December 20, 2013 --- 3:45 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A federal appeals court panel has upheld an injunction blocking Wisconsin's new law requiring abortion providers to have hospital admitting privileges from taking effect.

Planned Parenthood and Affiliated Medical Services filed a federal lawsuit this summer alleging the law would force the organizations to close clinics in Appleton and Milwaukee because the facilities' providers lack admitting privileges. U.S. District Judge William Conley has issued a preliminary injunction blocking the law while he weighs the case.

State attorneys asked the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago to lift the injunction. A three-judge panel ruled unanimously Friday that the injunction can continue.

Judge Richard Posner wrote the clinics face greater harm than the state if the injunction is lifted, the law goes into effect and Conley then strikes it down.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

______________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, December 3, 2013 --- 12:30 p.m.

CHICAGO (AP) -- An appellate court in Chicago has heard arguments on a hotly debated Wisconsin law requiring abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

Tuesday's hour-long hearing at 7th Circuit Court of Appeals will help the three-judge panel decide whether to lift a temporary block on the law imposed by a lower court.

Judges aggressively questioned an attorney defending Wisconsin's law. Judge Richard Posner repeatedly broached the question of why legislators singled out abortion clinics for the requirement and did not extend the law to other outpatient clinics performing more dangerous procedures. Posner says the Wisconsin law "sounds irrational."

Critics say the law on admitting privileges is a back door approach to stymie abortion rights. Supporters say the law protects women's health.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

______________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, December 2, 2013 --- 2:11 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A federal appeals court is set to hear arguments in a lawsuit challenging Wisconsin's contentious new law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals.

Republicans who wrote the law say it's designed to ensure continuity of care. But Planned Parenthood and Affiliated Medical Services filed a federal lawsuit alleging the law would force the organizations to close two clinics in Appleton and Milwaukee because providers at both facilities lack admitting privileges.

U.S. District Judge William Conley issued a preliminary injunction in August blocking the law from taking effect. State attorneys have asked the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago to lift the injunction.

The court is expected to hear oral arguments Tuesday morning.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

_____________________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, July 8, 2013 --- 6:33 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A federal judge has granted a temporary restraining order blocking enforcement of a new Wisconsin law that bans doctors who lack admitting privileges at nearby hospitals from performing abortions.

U.S. District Judge William Conley granted the hold Monday evening after a hearing earlier in the day. The restraining order will remain in place pending a fuller hearing July 17.

Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin and Affiliated Medical Services filed a lawsuit Friday. It alleged that the requirement would unconstitutionally restrict the availability of abortions in the state, violates the U.S. Constitution's due process guarantee and unconstitutionally treats doctors who perform abortions differently from those who perform other procedures.

The bill was introduced in the Legislature on June 4, passed nine days later and signed into law Friday by Gov. Scott Walker.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

___________________________________________

Posted: Monday, July 8, 2013 --- 6:18 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Judge grants temporary restraining order blocking enforcement of new Wisconsin abortion law.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

______________________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, July 8, 2013 --- 4:00 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A federal judge says he will rule by Tuesday morning on a request to temporarily block enforcement of a new Wisconsin law that requires women seeking abortions to first undergo an ultrasound.

The lawsuit filed by Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin and the American Civil Liberties Union challenges another part of the law that bans doctors who lack admitting privileges at nearby hospitals from performing the procedures.

U.S. District Judge William Conley heard arguments Monday in a hastily called hearing. Conley says he will make a decision no later than Tuesday morning on whether the law can remain in effect at least until a July 17 hearing he scheduled on the lawsuit.

Gov. Scott Walker signed the Republican-backed bill into law on Friday and it took effect on Monday.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

______________________________________________________

UPDATED Friday, July 5, 2013 --- 10:30 p.m.
Reporter: Phil Levin

Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin is hoping for a restraining order against an abortion law Governor Scott Walker announced he signed Friday.

The law requires ultrasounds before procedures. The group is challenging the constitutionality of a second portion that requires doctors have the ability to admit patients at a nearby hospital.

Planned Parenthood has clinics in Madison, Milwaukee and Appleton, a clinic they expect to close if a restraining order is not granted.

There were 7,019 induced abortions in Wisconsin in 2011, according to the Department of Health Services. Affiliated Medical Services runs the only other abortion clinic in the state in Milwaukee and is joining the legal challenge against the law.

"If they have to come to Milwaukee or Madison, that's an additional 200 mile round trip," said Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin Director Teri Huyck. "With the reduction in our capacity with Affiliated having closed that means there will be long waiting periods. It's a safe procedure but it's safer the earlier you do it."

Others are criticizing the law's requirement women be provided ultrasounds before an abortion.

"Whether an individual is swayed by the ultrasound or not, it is not for the legislators to be mandating that women have these intrusive, not medically necessary procedures," said Sara Finger of Wisconsin Alliance for Women's Health.

The law's supporters are confident it will be declared constitutional.

"Abortion seems to be the only situation where the abortionist can pack her up into an ambulance and say bye-bye and never see her again," said Susan Armacost of Wisconsin Right to Life.

"They should have people who qualify, and it should have been up to them before they ever opened their doors as abortion clinics to make sure that there was someone there that had hospital privileges. So this whining no one should have any sympathy for."

Planned Parenthood is hoping a federal judge grants a restraining order on Monday.

____________________

UPDATED Friday, July 5, 2013 --- 11:44 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Planned Parenthood is poised to challenge provisions that would require women seeking an abortion to view an ultrasound of the fetus before the procedure as soon as they become law.

The Republican-controlled Legislature passed a bill last month that would require abortion providers to point out a fetus' features on the ultrasound and have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles to perform the procedure.

Planned Parenthood contends the language is designed to shut down its Appleton clinic. None of the providers there have hospital admitting privileges within 30 miles.

Republican Gov. Scott Walker is expected to sign the bill into law but it's unclear when. Planned Parenthood's attorneys said Friday they plan to file a federal lawsuit alleging the provisions are unconstitutional as soon as Walker takes action.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, June 10, 2013 --- 3:09 p.m.
Posted Monday, June 10, 2013 --- 12:21 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Planned Parenthood says it would close its Appleton abortion facility if a new bill affecting abortion policies gets signed into law.

The legislation was sponsored by Republican Sen. Mary Lazich. It would require that doctors have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles of where the abortion would be performed.

Planned Parenthood spokeswoman Nicole Safar tells The Associated Press that physicians at the Appleton facility can't meet the 30-mile requirement.

A Senate committee passed the measure Monday.

It would also require that physicians perform or arrange for ultrasounds for women seeking abortions.

Safar says the exact timeline for the closure would depend on when the bill is signed into law. Besides its Appleton site, Planned Parenthood provides abortion in Madison and Milwaukee facilities.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
NBC15 615 Forward Drive Madison, Wisconsin 53711 Business: 608-274-1515 Newsroom: 608-274-1500
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 210851381 - nbc15.com/a?a=210851381