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UPDATE: Walker signs bills giving 1 percent pay raises

UPDATED Friday, January 24, 2014 --- 1:36 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker has signed five bills granting 1 percent pay raises to unions representing about 2,400 state workers.

Walker signed the bills Friday. They had passed the Senate and Assembly unanimously.

The pay raises will be applied retroactively to June 30.

Non-union state workers, the vast majority of the 69,000 state employees, received the same 1 percent raise under the budget that took effect in July.

Most bargaining units decided not to negotiate since the 2011 law known as Act 10 limited bargaining to just base pay increases no greater than inflation.

The five unions represent all state education professionals, all classified attorneys, nurses, electricians, and others represented by the building and trades bargaining unit, research analysts and economists.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, January 14, 2014 --- 5:15 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Legislature has approved union contracts granting 1 percent pay raises for five small bargaining unions representing about 2,400 workers.

The Senate unanimously approved the contracts without debate Tuesday. The Assembly followed suit later in the day, approving the deals unanimously.

Once passed and signed by Gov. Scott Walker, the pay raises would be applied retroactively to June 30.

Non-union state workers, the vast majority of the 69,000 state employees, received the same 1 percent raise under the budget that took effect in July.

Most bargaining units decided not to negotiate since the 2011 law known as Act 10 limited bargaining to just base pay increases no greater than inflation.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, January 14, 2014 --- 12:35 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Senate has approved union contracts granting 1 percent pay raises for five small bargaining unions representing about 2,400 workers.

The Senate unanimously approved the contracts without debate Tuesday. The Assembly was scheduled to pass them later in the day.

Once passed and signed by Gov. Scott Walker, the pay raises would be applied retroactively to June 30.

Non-union state workers, the vast majority of the 69,000 state employees, received the same 1 percent raise under the budget that took effect in July.

Most bargaining units decided not to negotiate since the 2011 law known as Act 10 limited bargaining to just base pay increases no greater than inflation.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, January 14, 2014 --- 8:02 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Legislature is poised to approve union contracts granting 1 percent pay raises for five small bargaining unions representing about 2,400 workers.

Both the Senate and Assembly are scheduled to vote on the contracts Tuesday.

Once passed and signed by Gov. Scott Walker, the pay raises would be applied retroactively to June 30.

Non-union state workers, the vast majority of the 69,000 state employees, received the same 1 percent raise under the budget that took effect in July.

Democrats and union leaders have questioned why it took so long for the union deals reached over the summer to be approved.

Most bargaining units decided not to negotiate since the 2011 law known as Act 10 limited bargaining to just base pay increases no greater than inflation.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, December 19, 2013 --- 11:07 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A special committee of Wisconsin legislative leaders has approved a 1 percent pay raise for five state employee unions representing about 2,400 workers.

The Joint Committee on Employment Relations approved the contracts Thursday. The deals must now be approved by the Legislature before they take effect.

Non-union state workers, the vast majority of the 69,000 state employees, received a 1 percent raise under the budget that took effect in July. Raises negotiated by these five smaller units have not taken effect because lawmakers haven't yet voted to approve the contracts.

The pay raises would be retroactive to June 30 once approved by the Legislature.

The five unions represent all state-employed education professionals, all classified attorneys, nurses, electricians, research analysts and economists.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, December 19, 2013 --- 5:40 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A special committee of Wisconsin legislative leaders is scheduled to vote on approving 1 percent pay raises for five state employee unions representing about 2,400 workers.

The vote Thursday is by the Joint Committee on Employment Relations.

Non-union state workers, the vast majority of the 69,000 state employees, received a 1 percent raise under the budget that took effect in July. Raises negotiated by these five smaller units have not taken effect because lawmakers haven't yet voted to approve the contracts.

Once the committee approves them, the deals must be approved by both the Senate and Assembly.

The pay raises would be retroactive to June 30.

The five unions represent all state-employed education professionals, all classified attorneys, nurses, electricians, research analysts and economists.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Posted Monday, December 16, 2013 --- 11:20 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A legislative committee has scheduled a meeting to vote on proposed contracts for five smaller Wisconsin unions.

Non-union state workers received a 1 percent raise in July. Raises negotiated by these five smaller units representing about 2,400 people have not taken effect because lawmakers haven't voted to approve the contracts.

The Joint Committee on Employment Relations is set to take up the contracts Thursday. Once passed by the committee, the contracts would have to be approved by the Legislature before taking effect.

Union leaders and Democrats have complained that Republicans and Walker's administration stalled voting on the tentative deals.

Most bargaining units decided not to negotiate since the 2011 law known as Act 10 limited bargaining just to base pay increases no greater than inflation.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


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