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UPDATE: Governor signs DNA collection bill

UPDATED Tuesday, April 8, 2014 --- 4:40 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker has signed a bill scaling back when police can seize DNA samples under a law to take effect next year.

Under current state law only convicted felons and sex offenders have to give up their DNA. A new law taking effect next year requires police to take DNA from anyone arrested for a felony and adults convicted of a misdemeanor.

The bill Walker signed Tuesday scales that back, allowing police to take DNA upon arrest only if the person has been arrested for a violent felony such as rape or assault.

The measure also specifies the samples would go to the state crime lab rather than allowing local police to hold them. The lab couldn't analyze the DNA until there's been a finding of probable cause.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 1, 2014 --- 8:31 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A more limited bill dealing with when DNA samples are collected from people under arrest has been passed by the Wisconsin state Senate.

The measure originally called for collecting DNA from anyone arrested for a felony. But the latest version approved Tuesday would restrict collection only to those people arrested for violent felonies like rape and assault.

It previously cleared the Assembly and now goes to Gov. Scott Walker.

The DNA collection law takes effect in April 2015. It also will require DNA to be taken from anyone convicted of misdemeanors. Current law requires DNA collection only from convicted felons and sex offenders.

The DNA collected would go straight to the state crime lab, rather than be kept by local police.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 1, 2014 --- 9:45 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A more limited bill dealing with when DNA samples are collected from people under arrest is up for a final vote before the Wisconsin state Senate.

The measure originally called for collecting DNA from anyone arrested for a felony. But the latest version which passed the Assembly last month would restrict collection only to those people arrested for violent felonies like rape and assault.

If passed by the Senate on Tuesday it will go to Gov. Scott Walker.

The DNA collection law takes effect in April 2015. It also will require DNA to be taken from anyone convicted of misdemeanors. Current law requires DNA collection only from convicted felons and sex offenders.

The DNA collected would go straight to the state crime lab, rather than be kept by local police.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, March 21, 2014 --- 5:52 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- DNA would be collected only from people arrested for violent felonies like rape and assault under a bill that has passed the state Assembly.

The bill passed Friday now goes back to the Senate, which must pass it April 1 or it will die.

The bill makes changes to a law set to go into effect in April 2015 which requires DNA to be collected from anyone arrested on suspicion of a felony.

The DNA collected would go straight to the state crime lab, rather than be kept by local police. The Department of Justice would not be allowed to analyze the DNA until there has been a finding of probable cause or other conditions are met.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, March 20, 2014 --- 2:28 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Republicans who control the Wisconsin Assembly are divided on how to handle collection of DNA from people arrested for felonies.

Speaker Robin Vos said Thursday that Republicans are not unified in support of a bill that passed the Senate last week that would require the DNA collected to go straight to the state crime lab, rather than be kept by local police.

Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen has complained that delaying getting the DNA to the crime lab needlessly complicated the law, which takes effect in April 2015.

Under the Senate version of the bill, the Department of Justice would not be allowed to analyze the DNA until there has been a finding of probable cause or other conditions are met.

The Assembly was to vote on the bill Thursday.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

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Posted Tuesday, March 11, 2014 --- 3:22 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin state Senate has voted to change a state law that requires police to collect DNA from people arrested for felonies.

The Senate voted Tuesday to have the DNA go directly to the state crime lab rather than have the local law enforcement agency that makes the arrest hold on the sample. The Department of Justice would not be allowed to analyze the DNA until there has been a finding of probable cause or other conditions are met.

Republican Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen had complained that delaying getting the DNA to the crime lab needlessly complicated the law, which takes effect in April 2015.

The bill now heads to the Assembly, which must also pass it before it would go to Gov. Scott Walker.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.


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