UPDATE: Wisconsin justices hear voter ID arguments

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UPDATED Tuesday, February 25, 2014 --- 5:51 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A conservative-leaning Wisconsin Supreme Court justice says she has problems with the state's voter photo identification law.

The NAACP has filed a lawsuit challenging the Republican-authored law, arguing it creates an undue burden on people to obtain state-issued IDs and paying for copies of supporting documents such as birth certificates. The Wisconsin Department of Justice is defending the law.

The justices heard oral arguments in the case on Tuesday. Justice Pat Roggensack, a member of the court's four-justice conservative majority, told DOJ attorney Clayton Kawski she's concerned someone might have to pay for copies of documents needed to get an ID. She says that equates to paying the state to vote.

Kawski said some people will face a burden but 90 percent of Wisconsin residents already have an ID.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press
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UPDATED Tuesday, February 25, 2014 --- 12:35 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A conservative-leaning Wisconsin Supreme Court justice says she has problems with the state's voter photo identification law.

The NAACP has filed a lawsuit challenging the Republican-authored law, arguing it creates an undue burden on people to obtain state-issued IDs and paying for copies of supporting documents such as birth certificates. The Wisconsin Department of Justice is defending the law.

The justices heard oral arguments in the case on Tuesday. Justice Pat Roggensack, a member of the court's four-justice conservative majority, told DOJ attorney Clayton Kowski she's concerned someone might have to pay for copies of documents needed to get an ID. She says that equates to paying the state to vote.

Kowski said some people will face a burden but 90 percent of Wisconsin residents already have an ID.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, February 25, 2014 --- 11:24 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- An attorney is trying to convince the Wisconsin Supreme Court to strike down the state's voter photo identification law.

The League of Women Voters alleges the Legislature overstepped its bounds when it put the requirement into place in 2011. The league's attorney, Lester Pines, told the justices during oral arguments Tuesday the mandate amounts to a new voter qualification that goes beyond the Wisconsin Constitution's requirements for voters. Pines said the mandate will destroy the right to vote.

Wisconsin Justice Department attorney Clayton Kowski is defending the law. He says the law is an extension of the Legislature's ability to set voter registration requirements.

The justices were set to hear oral arguments in the NAACP's challenge to the law later Tuesday.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, February 25, 2014 --- 9:25 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Supreme Court is set to hear arguments in a pair of lawsuits challenging the state's voter photo identification law.

The NAACP's Milwaukee branch and the League of Women voters have challenged the law in separate actions.

Dane County judges struck the law down in both cases. But the 4th District Court of Appeals deemed the requirement constitutional in the League of Women Voters' case, prompting the league to take it to the high court. Meanwhile the justices have decided to take the NAACP case out of the 2nd District Court of Appeals and decide it themselves.

Oral arguments are set for Tuesday morning. The court has allotted an hour on each case.

Two other challenges are pending in federal court in Milwaukee.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, January 28, 2014 --- 4:00 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Supreme Court has scheduled oral arguments in two cases challenging the state's voter photo identification law for next month.

The justices announced Tuesday they would listen to arguments in both cases during a joint hearing on Feb. 25.

The Milwaukee branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the League of Women Voters have both challenged the law. Dane County judges struck the law down in both cases.

But the 4th District Court of Appeals ruled the law was constitutional in the League of Women Voters case, prompting the league to seek Supreme Court review. The justices in November decided to pluck the NAACP case out of the 2nd District Court of Appeals.

A federal judge is considering two other challenges to the law.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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Posted Wednesday, November 20, 2013 --- 12:56 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Supreme Court has decided to hear arguments in two separate lawsuits challenging the state's requirement that voters show photo identification at the polls.

The court's orders were issued Wednesday.

One case was brought by the Milwaukee branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the immigrant rights group Voces de la Frontera. A Dane County judge ruled in 2012 that the law was unconstitutional.

The appeal of that case was scheduled for arguments Dec. 17 before the 2nd District Court of Appeals, but now the Supreme Court is taking the case.

The Supreme Court says it will also hear arguments at the same time in a second lawsuit challenging the law filed by the League of Women Voters.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


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