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UPDATE: Funeral Held for Boy, 8, Killed by Marathon Bomb


UPDATED Tuesday, April 23, 2013 --- 12:02 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- The family of the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombing says a private funeral has been held for the boy, 8-year-old Martin Richard.

A statement released on behalf of the family says a funeral Mass was celebrated with immediate family on Tuesday, followed by burial. The family says it plans to hold a public memorial service for the boy sometime in the coming weeks.

Martin was one of three people killed in the April 15 attack at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. His mother and sister were among the more than 260 others wounded.

In the statement, the family from Boston's Dorchester neighborhood calls the past week "the most difficult week of our lives." It says they appreciated the outpouring of love and support they have received.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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BOSTON (AP) -- Federal officials say the Boston Marathon bombing suspect's medical condition has improved.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev had been listed in serious condition at a Boston hospital since he was captured Friday. On Tuesday, the U.S. attorney's office said his condition had been upgraded to fair.

The 19-year-old was wounded in a shootout with police and suffered gunshot wounds in the head, neck, legs and hand.

Tsarnaev was charged Monday in the twin bombings that killed three people and wounded more than 260. His older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed during the shootout.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 23, 2013 --- 11:12 a.m.

NORTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. (AP) -- Lawyers for the wife of the deceased Boston Marathon bombing suspect say she is doing everything she can to assist authorities.

But they wouldn't say Tuesday if Katherine Tsarnaeva, widow of Tamerlan Tsarnaev, has spoken to investigators yet.

Providence attorneys Amato DeLuca and Miriam Weizenbaum issued a statement Tuesday saying Tsarnaeva is deeply mourning the bombing victims. They say that Tsarnaeva and her family were in shock when they learned of allegations against her husband and brother-in-law, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

The lawyers say Tsarnaeva, whose toddler is the daughter of the late suspect, is "trying to come to terms with these events."

DeLuca told the Associated Press on Sunday that federal investigators want to speak with his client. They wouldn't comment Tuesday beyond the statement.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 23, 2013 --- 10:26 a.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Two U.S. officials say slain Boston bombing suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was an ardent reader of jihadist websites and extremist propaganda in the run-up to last week's marathon attacks that killed three people and wounded 180.

Authorities believe neither Tamerlan nor his younger brother Dzhokhar had links to terror groups. But law enforcement officials have concluded based on an early interrogation and other evidence that the two brothers were motivated by an anti-American, radical version of Islam.

On Tuesday, two officials said that Tamerlan frequently looked at extremist propaganda, including Inspire magazine, an English-language online publication aimed at aspiring lone-wolf terrorists.

Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED: Monday, April 22, 2013 --- 1:10pm

BOSTON (AP) -- Complaint: Bombing suspect charged with using, conspiring to use weapon of mass destruction.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED: Sunday, April 21, 2013 -- 3 a.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- The American Civil Liberties Union says it's concerned about investigators' plans to interrogate the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect without reading him his Miranda rights.

The Massachusetts Federal Public Defender's office says it will take the case of 19-year-old bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Public defender Miriam Conrad says there are "serious issues" regarding the interrogation.

But it's not clear when Tsarnaev will be able to answer questions. He's hospitalized in serious condition and under heavy guard after being arrested Friday night following a daylong manhunt punctuated by gunfire.

The capture came at the end of a tense Friday that began with his 26-year-old brother Tamerlan dying in a gunbattle with police.

Copyright Associated Press 2013
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UPDATED: Friday, April 19, 2013 --10:21pm

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- Celebrations erupted in Boston and beyond as the capture of the remaining marathon bombing suspect was announced in a tweet from police.

In the neighborhood where 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev engaged in a firefight with police while hiding out in a parked boat, dozens of people at a police barricade cheered and applauded as law enforcement officers and emergency responders left the scene.

Tsarnaev was taken to a hospital after his capture Friday night.

The jubilation was widespread. The mayor of Boston tweeted, "We got him!" And at the home of the New York Mets, fans leapt to their feet and cheered.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED: Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 7:02pm

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- A round of blasts has been heard in Watertown, Mass., amid the search for the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Emergency and military vehicles sped through town after an earlier burst of gunfire.

State police spokesman David Procopio says there is "renewed activity in Watertown" is connected to the search for 19-year-old college student Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (JOH'-kahr tsahr-NY'-ev).

Authorities are telling residents of the area to stay indoors.

The burst of activity came at the end of a tense day in and around Boston, and less than an hour after police announced that they were scaling back the hunt because they had come up empty-handed following an all-day search that sent thousands of SWAT team officers into the streets and paralyzed the metropolitan area.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 6:22 p.m.

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- The sound of gunfire has been reported in Watertown, Mass., where authorities have been searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings.

Emergency and military vehicles are speeding through town. Police tell The Associated Press that multiple shots have been fired. Boston police say people should stay inside around a street in Watertown.

It wasn't immediately clear whether authorities had found 19-year-old college student Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

Authorities are telling residents of the area to stay indoors.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 6:09 p.m.

From NBC News:

By Pete Williams, Richard Esposito, Michael Isikoff and Tracy Connor, NBC News

The sound of gunfire erupted in a Boston suburb Friday evening, less than an hour after police said residents could leave their homes even though the marathon bombing suspect was still on the run after an all-day, door-to-door search.

The barrage of gunfire was heard in Watertown, Mass., which had been the focus of the manhunt. Police and armored vehicles tore down a street and residents were turned to take shelter.

The apparent shots rang out less than an hour after Massachusetts State Police Col. Timothy Alben told a press conference that fugitive Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, had probably not left the state but nevertheless lifted a lockdown order that had been in effect all day.

As the manhunt continued, police released new details about the scope of a bloody overnight rampage that began with the death of a campus security officer and ended with the death of Tsarnaev's 26-year-old brother, Tamerlan, with a bomb strapped to his body.

Hours after the FBI released their photos Thursday night, the brothers exchanged 200 rounds with police during a stunning pre-dawn firefight and left behind seven homemade explosives, officials said.

The violence led to an extraordinary shutdown of transportation, schools and businesses in Boston and its surrounding suburbs, with police warning more than a million people to hunker down behind locked doors while SWAT teams fanned out looking for the younger suspect.

Investigators chased leads all day but could not find the suspect, a naturalized U.S. citizen of Chechen origin who grew up in Cambridge after his family moved here a year ago, seeking asylum.

“There is still a very, very dangerous individual at large," said Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick said Friday night.

Nevertheless, officials said residents could venture outside and the subway system was going back on line. Patrols were being beefed up in Watertown, where the suspect was last seen, but state police tactical units were pulling back.

It was a rapid turn of events after a night of violence that police said included the slaying of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology patrol officer in his car in Cambridge, a carjacking and a half-hour hell ride for a man who was eventually released unharmed, before the gun battle with police.

The drama began at MIT about five hours after the FBI released surveillance photos of two "extremely dangerous" men suspected of planting two bombs near the finish line of Monday's Boston Marathon, killing three and wounding 176.

Tips about the identity of the suspects were still pouring in when the Tsarnaev brothers fatally shot campus officer Sean Collier, 26, in his vehicle at 10:20 p.m., law enforcement officials said.

The brothers then carjacked a Mercedes SUV, holding the driver captive for a half-hour while they tried to use his cash card to get money from three ATM's, a source said. At the first, they put in the wrong number; at the second, they took out $800 and at the third, they were told they had exceeded the withdrawal limit, the source said.

The carjacking victim was released unharmed at a gas station in Cambridge, sources said. He told police the brothers said they were the marathon bombers and had just killed a campus officer.

As the duo sped in his car toward Watertown, a police chase ensued and they tossed explosive devices out the window, officials said.

There was a long exchange of gunfire, according to Andrew Kitzenberg of Watertown, who took photos of the clash from his window and shared them via social media.

“They were also utilizing bombs, which sounded and looked like grenades, while engaging in the gunfight,” he told NBC News in an interview. “They also had what looked like a pressure-cooker bomb.

“I saw them light this bomb. They threw it towards the officers,” he said. “There was smoke that covered our entire street.”

A transit officer, identified as Richard H. Donahue, 33, was seriously injured during the pursuit. Authorities said he underwent surgery at Mount Auburn Hospital.

Kitzenberg said he saw the firefight end when Tamerlan Tsarnaev ran toward the officers and ultimately fell to the ground.

Tamerlan -- the man in the black hat from FBI photos released six hours earlier -- had an improvised explosive device strapped to his chest, law enforcement officials said.

Dzhokhar -- the brother who was wearing a white hat in the surveillance photos from the marathon -- got away when he drove the SUV through a line of police officers at the end of the street, Kitzenberg said.

Law enforcement sources told NBC News that blood found at the scene suggests Dzhokhar may have been wounded in the gun battle. The FBI released more photos of him, including a surveillance camera photo from a convenience store where the brothers had stopped for gas.

The suspects' uncle, Ruslan Tsarni, called the brothers "losers" and urged Dzhokhar to turn himself in.

"We're ashamed," he thundered outside his Maryland home.

The frantic search for the alleged bomber left streets across the Boston area eerily quiet. Subways and buses were shut down, and Amtrak service to Boston was cut. The Red Sox and Boston Bruins' home games were canceled.

Harvard University, Boston University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Emerson University were closed. The University of Massachusetts' Dartmouth campus was evacuated because of a possible tie to someone in the case, the school said.

The lockdown initially affected more than 300,000 people in Cambridge, Watertown, Newton, Brighton, Allston and Belmont, but by 8 a.m., the entire city of Boston was paralyzed.

Watertown was the epicenter of the search. Frightened residents were trapped inside as convoys of heavily armed officers and troops arrived by the hour and snipers perched on rooftops and in backyards.

Amid the search, Dzhokhar's father, in Russia, told The Associated Press he was "a true angel" and described him as a medical student who was expected to visit for the holidays.

Authorities painted a starkly different picture.

"We believe this man to be a terrorist," Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said. "We believe this to be a man who's come here to kill people."

Secretary of State John Kerry, who is from Massachusetts, praised law enforcement for their work during "a pretty direct confrontation with evil."

"In the past few days we have seen the best and we've seen the worst of human behavior, and it's the best that all of us really want to focus on," he said.

Senate Intelligence Committee chairwoman Dianne Feinstein told NBC News it's clear the marathon bombing was "a terrorist attack."

"It's also clear, you know, that you know you don't have to be a card-carrying member of any terrorist group to commit a terrorist attack," she said.

NBC News' Jonathan Dienst and Kasie Hunt contributed to this story.

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UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 3:55 p.m.

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- Massachusetts State Police say a pair of brothers suspected in the Boston Marathon bombings spent the night in a Honda Civic and used it to carjack a Mercedes SUV.

Police said Friday at a Watertown news conference that one of the brothers stayed with the carjacking victim for a few minutes and then let him go.

They say one brother drove away in the Civic, and the other one drove away in the Mercedes.

Police say one then ditched the Civic and reunited with his brother in the Mercedes. Authorities say both suspects were in the Mercedes when they encountered police and hurled explosives at officers. Twenty-six-year-old suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed.

The Civic was later recovered in Boston.

Nineteen-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev remains on the loose.

UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 1:17 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- Key moments related to the search for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, based on reports from the Middlesex County district attorney, Massachusetts State Police and Boston police.

-- At 5:10 p.m. Thursday, investigators of the bombings release photographs and video of two suspects. They ask for the public's help in identifying the men.

-- Around 10:20 p.m., shots are fired on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

-- At 10:30 p.m., an MIT campus police officer who was responding to a disturbance is found shot multiple times in his vehicle, apparently in a confrontation with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. He is later pronounced dead.

-- Shortly afterward, two armed men reportedly carjack a Mercedes SUV in Cambridge. A man who was in the vehicle is held for about a half hour and then released unharmed at a gas station on Memorial Drive in Cambridge.

-- Police soon pursue the carjacked vehicle in Watertown, just west of Cambridge.

-- Some kind of explosive devices are thrown from the vehicle in an apparent attempt to stop police. The carjackers and police exchange gunfire. A transit police officer is seriously injured. One suspect, later identified as Suspect No. 1 in the marathon bombings, is critically injured and later pronounced dead.

-- Authorities launch a manhunt for the other suspect.

-- Around 1 a.m. Friday, gunshots and explosions are heard in Watertown. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents converge on a Watertown neighborhood. A helicopter circles overhead.

-- Around 4:30 a.m., Massachusetts state and Boston police tell people living in that section of eastern Watertown to stay in their homes. They identify the carjackers as the same men suspected in the marathon bombings. Overnight, police also release a photograph of a man believed to be Suspect No. 2 wearing a gray hoodie-style sweatshirt. The image apparently was taken from surveillance video at a 7-Eleven convenience store in Cambridge. Authorities say the suspects robbed the store late Thursday.

-- Around 5:50 a.m. authorities urge residents in Watertown, Newton, Waltham, Belmont, Cambridge, Arlington and the Allston-Brighton neighborhoods of Boston to stay indoors. All mass transit is shut down.

-- Around 6:35 a.m., The Associated Press reports that the bomb suspects are from a Russian region near Chechnya and lived in the United States for at least a year.

-- Around 6:45 a.m., The Associated Press identifies the surviving Boston bomb suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, who has been living in Cambridge.

-- Around 8 a.m., Boston's police commissioner says all of Boston must stay in their homes as the search for the surviving suspect in the bombings continues.

-- Around 8:40 a.m., a U.S. law enforcement official and the uncle of the suspects confirm that the name of the slain suspect is Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's older brother.

-- Around 10:20 a.m., Connecticut State Police say a gray Honda CRV believed to be linked to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev has been recovered in Boston.

-- Around 10:35 a.m., the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth says it closed its campus and ordered an evacuation after confirming that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is registered there. The school says it closed the campus "out of an abundance of caution" as the search continued.

-- Around 11:30 a.m., Massachusetts State Police explain that the brothers suspected in the bombings were in the Honda CRV when they carjacked the Mercedes SUV. For a while, each drove one of the two vehicles, but then ditched the Honda and reunited in the Mercedes.

-- Around 12:35 p.m., state police in Watertown say officers are searching door-to-door but still have not found the bombing suspect.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 11:49 a.m.

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- State police say officers are going door-to-door, but the Boston Marathon suspect is still on the loose.

Col. Timothy Alben of the Massachusetts State Police said Friday afternoon that officers would go street to street as the manhunt for the bombing suspect continues. Gov. Deval Patrick urged residents to continue staying indoors.

A pair of brothers is suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer late Thursday, then stealing a car at gunpoint.

The suspects' clashes with police began hours after the FBI released photos and videos of them. Monday's bombings killed three people and wounded more than 180 others.

Twenty-six-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev was killed overnight. His 19-year-old brother, Dzhokhar is on the loose.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 10:52 a.m.

MONTGOMERY VILLAGE, Md. (AP) -- The uncle of a Boston Marathon bombing suspect is urging his nephew to turn himself in.

Ruslan Tsarni of Montgomery Village, Md., said Friday that 19-year-old Dzhozkar Tsarnaev should turn himself in to police and ask for forgiveness. Officials say Tamerlan Tsarnaev, a 26-year-old who had been known to the FBI as Suspect No. 1, was killed overnight.

The brothers came from a Russian region near Chechnya and lived together in Cambridge, Mass. Tsarni says he hasn't seen them for several years.

He says the family is ashamed. He says he loves the U.S. and respects this country.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 10:24 a.m.

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) -- Sean Collier had only worked at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for about a year. But he was already popular with his colleagues in the campus police department, as well as with students, often joining them on hiking and skiing trips.

Authorities say the 26-year-old Collier was shot and killed by the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.

MIT says Collier was a Wilmington native and Somerville resident who had worked at MIT since January 2012. Before that, he was a civilian employee of the Somerville Police Department.

MIT Chief John DiFava says Collier was a dedicated officer, liked by his colleagues and the MIT community.

MIT President L. Rafael Reif says Collier's loss is "deeply painful."

Collier was found shot several times in his vehicle at about 10:30 p.m. Thursday.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 10:11 a.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- The Boston Marathon bombing suspect who was killed overnight had studied accounting as a part-time community college student.

Bunker Hill Community College officials say that 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev was a student there for three semesters: fall 2006, spring 2007 and fall 2008.

Spokeswoman Patricia Brady said Friday they had little information on Tsarnaev other than that he studied accounting at the Boston school.

Tsarnaev had been known to the FBI as Suspect No. 1 and was seen in surveillance footage in a black baseball cap.

The other suspect is his 19-year-old brother, Dzhokhar. He was a student at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 9:56 a.m.

MIDDLETOWN, Conn. (AP) -- Connecticut State Police say a vehicle believed to be linked to a wanted Boston Marathon bombing suspect has been recovered.

Police said in a news release Friday that a gray Honda CRV with Massachusetts plates was found in Boston. Authorities had said earlier that the vehicle "could possibly be occupied by" the suspect wanted in the Boston attacks. The suspect has since been identified by law enforcement officials and family members as 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev .

His brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed overnight.

The news release provided scant other details about the vehicle.

The two men are suspected of killing a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer late Thursday, then stealing a car at gunpoint. Monday's bombings killed three people and wounded more than 180 others.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED: Friday, April 19, 2013 --- 7:04 a.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- Key moments related to the search for the Boston Marathon bombing suspects, based on reports from the Middlesex County district attorney, Massachusetts State Police, and Boston police.

-- At 5:10 p.m. Thursday, investigators of the bombings release photographs and video of two suspects. They ask for the public's help in identifying the men.

-- Around 10:20 p.m., shots are fired on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

-- At 10:30 p.m., an MIT campus police officer who was responding to a disturbance is found shot multiple times in his vehicle, apparently in a confrontation with the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. He is later pronounced dead.

-- Shortly afterward, two armed men reportedly carjack a Mercedes SUV in Cambridge. A man who was in the vehicle is held for about a half hour and then released unharmed at a gas station on Memorial Drive in Cambridge.

-- Police soon pursue the carjacked vehicle in Watertown, just west of Cambridge.

-- Some kind of explosive devices are thrown from the vehicle in an apparent attempt to stop police. The carjackers and police exchange gunfire. A transit police officer is seriously injured. One suspect, later identified as Suspect No. 1 in the marathon bombings, is critically injured and later pronounced dead.

-- Authorities launch a manhunt for the other suspect.

-- Around 1 a.m. Friday, gunshots and explosions are heard in Watertown, just outside Boston. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents converge on a Watertown neighborhood. A helicopter circles overhead.

-- Around 4:30 a.m., Massachusetts state and Boston police hold a short outdoor news briefing. They tell people living in that section of eastern Watertown to stay in their homes. They identify the carjackers as the same men suspected in the marathon bombings. Overnight, police also release a photograph of a man believed to be Suspect No. 2, apparently taken from store video earlier in the evening at a 7-Eleven convenience store in Cambridge. He is wearing a grey hoodie-style sweatshirt.

-- Around 6:35 a.m., The Associated Press reports that the bomb suspects are from a Russian region near Chechnya and lived in the United States for at least 1 year.

-- Around 6:45 a.m., The Associated Press identifies the surviving Boston bomb suspect as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, who has been living in Cambridge, Mass.

UPDATED: Friday, April 19, 2013 -- 4:15 a.m.

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- Police in Boston have released a new photo showing the man believed to be a suspect in the marathon bombings, shown in earlier footage in a white hat.

In the new photo, he's wearing a gray hoodie sweatshirt pulled up on his head. Police say he's on the loose, and is considered a "threat to "anybody that might approach him."

Police have called him a "terrorist." Suspect No. 1, also known as the "black hat" suspect was taken into custody and later died.

The new photo was taken at a 7-Eleven in Cambridge, just across the river from the city.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED: Friday, April 19, 2013 --4:05 a.m.

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- Authorities say one of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing is dead and a massive manhunt is underway for another.

Residents of the Boston suburb of Watertown have been advised to keep their doors locked and not let anyone in.

The Middlesex district attorney says the two men are suspected of killing an MIT police officer at the college late Thursday, then stealing a car at gunpoint and later releasing its driver unharmed. Hours earlier, police had released photos of the bombing suspects and asked for the public's help finding them.

Authorities say the suspects threw explosives from the car as police followed it into Watertown. The suspects and police exchanged gunfire and one of the suspects was critically injured and later died.

Police say the suspect on loose is a "terrorist" who "came here to kill people."

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED: Friday, April 19, 2013 -- 4:04 a.m.

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) -- DA: 1 Boston suspect died at hospital after shootout with cops; explosives thrown in chase.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED: Friday, April 19, 2013 -- 4:03 a.m.

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- Police say one of two suspects in the shooting of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer is dead and a massive manhunt is underway for another, who is believed to be tied to the Boston Marathon bombing.

Shortly after the MIT officer was shot dead Thursday night, police got a report of a carjacking in Cambridge, just outside Boston. One of the two suspects in that officer's shooting was killed. Police say of the at-large suspect, "We believe this to be a terrorist."

The FBI said it is working with local authorities to determine what happened.

The MIT shooting on the Cambridge campus Thursday night was followed by reports of violence in nearby Watertown, about 10 miles west of Boston.

State police spokesman David Procopio had said there was a "strong possibility" the incidents are related.

The MIT officer had been responding to report of a disturbance Thursday night when he was shot multiple times, according to a statement from the Middlesex district attorney's office and Cambridge police. It said there were no other victims.

In Watertown, witnesses reported hearing multiple gunshots and explosions at about 1 a.m. Friday. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents were in the neighborhood and a helicopter circled overhead.

State police spokesman David Procopio said, "The incident in Watertown did involve what we believe to be explosive devices possibly, potentially, being used against the police officers."

Boston cab driver Imran Saif said he was standing on a street corner at a police barricade across from a diner when he heard an explosion.

"I heard a loud boom and then a rapid succession of pop, pop, pop," he said. "It sounded like automatic weapons. And then I heard the second explosion."

He said he could smell something burning and advanced to check it out but area residents at their windows yelled at him, "Hey, it's gunfire! Don't go that way!"

MIT said right after the 10:30 p.m. shooting that police were sweeping the campus in Cambridge and urged people to remain indoors. They urged people urged to stay away from the Stata Building, a mixed-use building with faculty offices, classrooms and a common area.

Hours later, MIT, which has about 11,000 students, said the campus was clear but the shooter was still on the loose.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED: Friday, April 19, 2013 -- 4:01 a.m.

WATERTOWN, Mass. (AP) -- Police say one of two suspects in the shooting of an MIT police officer is dead and a massive manhunt is underway for another, who is tied to the Boston Marathon bombing.

Shortly after the MIT officer was shot Thursday night, police got a report of a carjacking in Cambridge, just outside Boston.

Police say of the at-large suspect, "We believe this to be a terrorist."

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

The FBI is investigating whether the fatal shooting of a campus police officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and gunfire and explosions in a nearby town are related to the Boston Marathon bombings.

A Massachusetts State Police spokesman said early Friday that one person suspected in the gunfire and explosions has been accounted for and one is at large.

The FBI said it is working with local authorities to determine what happened.

The MIT shooting on the Cambridge campus Thursday night was followed by reports of violence in nearby Watertown, about 10 miles west of Boston.

State police spokesman David Procopio said there is a "strong possibility" the incidents are related.

The MIT officer had been responding to report of a disturbance Thursday night when he was shot multiple times, according to a statement from the Middlesex district attorney's office and Cambridge police. It said there were no other victims.

In Watertown, witnesses reported hearing multiple gunshots and explosions at about 1 a.m. Friday. Dozens of police officers and FBI agents were in the neighborhood and a helicopter circled overhead.

State police spokesman David Procopio said, "The incident in Watertown did involve what we believe to be explosive devices possibly, potentially, being used against the police officers."

Boston cab driver Imran Sais said he was standing on a street corner at a police barricade across from a diner when he heard an explosion.

"I heard a loud boom and then a rapid succession of pop, pop, pop," he said. "It sounded like automatic weapons. And then I heard the second explosion."

He said he could smell something burning and advanced to check it out but area residents at their windows yelled at him, "Hey, it's gunfire! Don't go that way!"

MIT said right after the 10:30 p.m. shooting that police were sweeping the campus in Cambridge and urged people to remain indoors. They urged people urged to stay away from the Stata Building, a mixed-use building with faculty offices, classrooms and a common area.

Hours later, MIT, which has about 11,000 students, said the campus was clear but the shooter was still on the loose.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED Thursday, April 18, 2013 --- 4:44 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- The FBI has released photos of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings and is asking for the public's help in identifying them.

FBI Agent Richard DesLauriers says one of the suspects is believed to have planted a device outside a restaurant near the finish line of the race. He says both suspects are considered armed and extremely dangerous.

Within moments of the FBI releasing the images on its website, the agency's website crashed.

The explosions Monday killed three people and injured more than 180.

The images were released hours after President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama attended an interfaith service at a Roman Catholic cathedral in Boston to remember the victims, including an 8-year-old boy.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, April 18, 2013 --- 11:24 a.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama declared "there is a piece of Boston in me" as he paid tribute to a city shaken by what he has called an act of terror. He said: "Every one of us stands with you."

Obama addressed an interfaith service in the aftermath of Monday's twin blasts that killed three and injured more 170 people at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Obama said a day of beauty was shattered when a celebration became a tragedy.

He said Boston gathered Tuesday, quote, "to reaffirm that the spirit of this city is undaunted."

He declared: "You will run again!"

Of the perpetrator, he said: "We will find you."

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, April 18, 2013 --- 10:11 a.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says the FBI wants to speak with two men seen in at least one video from the Boston Marathon, but she says she isn't calling them suspects.

Without providing details of the men's appearance or what the video shows, Napolitano told the House Homeland Security Committee on Thursday that "there is some video that raised the question" of two men the FBI would like to interview but said she wouldn't described them as suspects.

Napolitano said it's still unclear whether the bombs that exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon were the work of foreign or domestic terrorists. She said the investigation is continuing "apace."

Three people were killed and more than 170 others were injured when the bombs exploded Monday.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 17, 2013 --- 10:55pm

LA CROSSE, Wis. (AP) -- A double-amputee who makes prosthetic limbs in Wisconsin knows what victims of the Boston Marathon bombing are going through.

Francis Manning says hearing about Monday's explosions -- and people whose limbs were amputated -- reminded him of his accident and the challenges he faced.

When Manning was 18, both of his legs were mangled when he tried to jump on a moving train in 1988.

Manning spent a year in a wheelchair before his legs healed enough to make prosthetics a possibility. He now has two prosthetic legs.

He tells WKBT-TV (http://bit.ly/13dBOyi) that victims of the marathon bombing are going to have to learn to walk again if they're missing a limb.

Manning now helps others who have lost limbs. He builds prosthetics in La Crosse and mentors fellow amputees.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 17, 2013 --- 5:50 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- A politician says investigators poring over photos and videos from the Boston Marathon bombing have an image of a man dropping off a bag containing one of the bombs.

City Council President Stephen Murphy said Wednesday investigators saw the image on surveillance footage they got from a nearby department store. He says he doesn't know if investigators have identified the man.

Murphy says police officers involved in the probe say investigators have matched information from the surveillance footage with witness descriptions of someone leaving the scene.

Murphy says officers are chasing leads that could take them to the man. He says developing that information within the first 48 hours of the probe is a major breakthrough.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 17, 2013 --- 1:53 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- Federal officials are denying that a suspect is in custody in the Boston Marathon bombings.

A law enforcement official briefed on the investigation told The Associated Press on Wednesday a suspect was in custody.

But the FBI and the U.S. attorney's office in Boston dispute that.

The official who spoke to The Associated Press did so on condition of anonymity and stood by the information even after it was disputed.

The official was not authorized to divulge details of the investigation. The official had said the suspect was expected in federal court in Boston.

Reporters and police have converged at the courthouse.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 17, 2013 --- 1:38 p.m.

Tweet from NBC News: Multiple sources confirm to NBC News: "No Arrest".

The Associated Press is reporting a suspect has been taken into custody in the Boston Marathon bombings.

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 17, 2013 --- 1:13 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- A law enforcement official briefed on the investigation says a suspect has been taken into custody in the Boston Marathon bombings.

The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Wednesday. The official was not authorized to divulge details of the investigation.

The official says the suspect is expected in federal court in Boston.

Law enforcement agencies had earlier pleaded for the public to come forward with photos, videos or any information that might help them solve the twin bombings that killed three people and wounded more than 170 on Monday.

Investigators circulated information about the bombs, which involved kitchen pressure cookers packed with explosives, nails and other lethal shrapnel. But the FBI said nobody had claimed responsibility.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 17, 2013 --- 12:46 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- A law enforcement official briefed on the investigation says a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings is about to be arrested.

The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Wednesday. The official was not authorized to divulge details of the investigation.

The officials says the suspect is to be taken into custody by federal marshals and taken to a courthouse.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 17, 2013 --- 12:20 p.m.

According to NBC News:

Authorities in Boston have developed "solid leads" and are "zeroing in on some people" in the bombing investigation, sources tell NBC.

Authorities will hold a 4pm briefing with an update on the investigation.

According to the Boston Globe, Lord & Taylor video helped investigators ID a suspect.

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WASHINGTON (AP) -- Authorities investigating the deadly bombings at the Boston Marathon have recovered a piece of circuit board that they believe was part of one of the explosive devices, and also found the lid of a pressure cooker that apparently was catapulted onto the roof of a nearby building.

A law enforcement official briefed on the investigation confirmed to The Associated Press on Wednesday that authorities have recovered what they believe are some of the pieces of the explosive devices. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because this person was not authorized to publicly discuss evidence in the ongoing investigation.

A person close to the investigation previously told AP the bombs consisted of explosives put in 1.6-gallon pressure cookers, one with shards of metal and ball bearings, the other with nails.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 16, 2013 --- 2:48 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- A law enforcement official says it's possible that a man who was stopped by police as he ran from the scene of yesterday's bombings at the Boston marathon was simply running to protect himself from the blast, as many others did.

The official says the man was tackled by a bystander, and then by police.

According to police, this is the man whose apartment in the Boston suburb of Revere was searched by FBI agents overnight. Investigators were seen leaving with brown paper bags, plastic trash bags and a duffel bag.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 16, 2013 --- 11:40 a.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A person briefed on the Boston Marathon investigation says the explosives were in 6-liter pressure cookers and placed in black duffel bags.

The person says the explosives were placed on the ground and contained shards of metal, nails and ball bearings. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the investigation was ongoing.

The person says law enforcement officials have some of the bomb components but did not yet know what was used to set off the explosives.

President Barack Obama said Tuesday the bombings were an act of terrorism but investigators do not know if they were carried out by an international or domestic organization, or perhaps by a "malevolent individual."

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 16, 2013 --- 10:41 a.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama says the explosions at the Boston Marathon are being investigated as an act of terror, although authorities still don't know who is responsible.

He called the bombing "a heinous and cowardly act" used to target innocent civilians.

Obama spoke to reporters at the White House after a briefing by his national security team.

Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, and more than 170 were wounded in Monday's bombing at the famous marathon's finish line.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 -- 8:55 a.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says no unexploded bombs were found at the Boston Marathon. He says the only explosives were the ones that went off Monday.

Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, and more than 150 injured by two explosions just seconds apart near the finish line.

Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers says there are no known additional threats and agents are following a number of leads.

Police commissioner Ed Davis says it is the most complex crime scene in history of the department.

Authorities are looking for amateur video and photographic evidence that can give clues to who set off the bombs.

Copyright Associated Press 2013

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UPDATED: Monday, April 15, 2013 -- 11:30 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) — Two bombs exploded in the crowded streets near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing at least three people and injuring more than 140 in a bloody scene of shattered glass and severed limbs that raised alarms that terrorists might have struck again in the U.S.

A White House official speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still unfolding said the attack was being treated as an act of terrorism.

President Barack Obama vowed that those responsible will "feel the full weight of justice."

As many as two unexploded bombs were also found near the end of the 26.2-mile course as part of what appeared to be a well-coordinated attack, but they were safely disarmed, according to a senior U.S. intelligence official, who also spoke on condition of anonymity because of the continuing investigation.

The fiery twin blasts took place about 10 seconds and about 100 yards apart, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet, shattering windows and sending dense plumes of smoke rising over the street and through the fluttering national flags lining the route. Blood stained the pavement, and huge shards were missing from window panes as high as three stories.

"They just started bringing people in with no limbs," said runner Tim Davey of Richmond, Va. He said he and his wife, Lisa, tried to shield their children's eyes from the gruesome scene inside a medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners, but "they saw a lot."

"They just kept filling up with more and more casualties," Lisa Davey said. "Most everybody was conscious. They were very dazed."

As the FBI took charge of the investigation, authorities shed no light on a motive or who may have carried out the bombings, and police said they had no suspects in custody. Officials in Washington said there was no immediate claim of responsibility.

WBZ-TV reported late Monday that law enforcement officers were searching an apartment in the Boston suburb of Revere. Massachusetts State Police confirmed that a search warrant related to the investigation into the explosions was served Monday night in Revere but provided no further details.

Police said three people were killed. An 8-year-old boy was among the dead, according to a person who talked to a friend of the family and spoke on condition of anonymity. The person said the boy's mother and sister were also injured as they waited for his father to finish the race.

Hospitals reported at least 144 people injured, at least 17 of them critically. The victims' injuries included broken bones, shrapnel wounds and ruptured eardrums.

At Massachusetts General Hospital, Alisdair Conn, chief of emergency services, said: "This is something I've never seen in my 25 years here ... this amount of carnage in the civilian population. This is what we expect from war."

Some 23,000 runners took part in the race, one of the world's oldest and most prestigious marathons.

One of Boston's biggest annual events, the race winds up near Copley Square, not far from the landmark Prudential Center and the Boston Public Library. It is held on Patriots Day, which commemorates the first battles of the American Revolution, at Concord and Lexington in 1775.

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis asked people to stay indoors or go back to their hotel rooms and avoid crowds as bomb squads methodically checked parcels and bags left along the race route. He said investigators didn't know whether the bombs were hidden in mailboxes or trash cans.

He said authorities had received "no specific intelligence that anything was going to happen" at the race.

The Federal Aviation Administration barred low-flying aircraft within 3.5 miles of the site.

"We still don't know who did this or why," Obama said at the White House, adding, "Make no mistake: We will get to the bottom of this."

With scant official information to guide them, members of Congress said there was little or no doubt it was an act of terrorism.

"We just don't know whether it's foreign or domestic," said Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas, chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security.

A few miles away from the finish line and around the same time, a fire broke out at the John F. Kennedy Library. The police commissioner said that it may have been caused by an incendiary device but that it was not clear whether it was related to the bombings.

The first explosion occurred on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the finish line, and some people initially thought it was a celebratory cannon blast.

When the second bomb went off, spectators' cheers turned to screams. As sirens blared, emergency workers and National Guardsmen who had been assigned to the race for crowd control began climbing over and tearing down temporary fences to get to the blast site.

The bombings occurred about four hours into the race and two hours after the men's winner crossed the finish line. By that point, more than 17,000 of the athletes had finished the marathon, but thousands more were still running.

The attack may have been timed for maximum carnage: The four-hour mark is typically a crowded time near the finish line because of the slow-but-steady recreational runners completing the race and because of all the friends and relatives clustered around to cheer them on.

Runners in the medical tent for treatment of dehydration or other race-related ills were pushed out to make room for victims of the bombing.

A woman who was a few feet from the second bomb, Brighid Wall, 35, of Duxbury, said that when it exploded, runners and spectators froze, unsure of what to do. Her husband threw their children to the ground, lay on top of them and another man lay on top of them and said, "Don't get up, don't get up."

After a minute or so without another explosion, Wall said, she and her family headed to a Starbucks and out the back door through an alley. Around them, the windows of the bars and restaurants were blown out.

She said she saw six to eight people bleeding profusely, including one man who was kneeling, dazed, with blood trickling down his head. Another person was on the ground covered in blood and not moving.

"My ears are zinging. Their ears are zinging," Wall said. "It was so forceful. It knocked us to the ground."

Competitors and race volunteers were crying as they fled the chaos. Authorities went onto the course to carry away the injured, while race stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site.

Roupen Bastajian, a state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., had just finished the race when he heard the blasts.

"I started running toward the blast. And there were people all over the floor," he said. "We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated. ... At least 25 to 30 people have at least one leg missing, or an ankle missing, or two legs missing."

The race honored the victims of the Newtown, Conn., shooting with a special mile marker in Monday's race.

Boston Athletic Association president Joanne Flaminio previously said there was "special significance" to the fact that the race is 26.2 miles long and 26 people died at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

Associated Press writers Jay Lindsay, Steve LeBlanc, Bridget Murphy and Meghan Barr in Boston; Julie Pace, Lara Jakes and Eileen Sullivan in Washington; and Marilynn Marchione in Milwaukee contributed to this report.

Copyright Associated Press 2013
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UPDATED Monday, April 15, 2013 --- 5:47 p.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama, responding to the explosions at the Boston Marathon, says the United States does not know "who did this or why" but vowed that whoever is responsible "will feel the full weight of justice."

He said: "We will find out who did this and we will hold them accountable."

Obama made his remarks Monday evening from the White House about three hours after two explosions detonated near the marathon's finish line. At least two people were killed and 50 injured in the blasts.

Obama has been in touch with federal law enforcement and Massachusetts officials in the aftermath of the explosions.

The Secret Service reacted cautiously to the blasts, expanding the security perimeter around the White House.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, April 15, 2013 --- 5:43 p.m.

By Erin McClam, Staff Writer, NBC News (From nbcnews.com)

With thousands of runners still on the course, two bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people, injuring scores more and turning the city’s most celebrated event into a grisly spectacle of shattered glass, blood and screams.

Video from the scene showed people fleeing and an enormous cloud of white smoke after two blasts went off about 20 seconds apart. Emergency personnel carried bloody spectators away.

“We saw two big puffs. I thought maybe it was fireworks. Then it went off again. And then all of a sudden we heard people crying and running away,” said Serghino Rene, who was a few blocks away. “It was a huge horde of people just running away.”

Steve Silva, a photographer for The Boston Globe, described “injuries nothing short of horrific.” Jackie Bruno, a reporter for New England Cable News, said on Twitter that she saw people’s legs blown off.

Federal officials told NBC News that Boston police were guarding a “possible suspect” who had been wounded in the blasts, but they cautioned that there was no information at the federal level to consider that person a suspect.

A third, undetonated device was found near the finish line, a House Homeland Security Committee official and three law enforcement officials told NBC News. Authorities also reported an explosion at the John F. Kennedy presidential library, elsewhere in the city, more than an hour after the blasts, but police said that it appeared to be caused by a fire. The police commissioner urged people in Boston to stay inside.

Five hospitals reported at least 86 people injured, including at least two children. Dr. Alisdair Conn, chief of emergency medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, characterized the injuries as like what Americans see on the news from a military-style bombing in Iraq or Israel.

“We still do not know who did this or why, and people shouldn’t jump to conclusions before we have all the facts, but make no mistake, we will get to the bottom of this,” President Barack Obama said from the White House. “Any responsible individuals, any responsible groups will feel the full weight of justice.”

He pledged the full help of the federal government and said: “The American people will say a prayer for Boston tonight.”

Suspicious packages were found after the blasts at three Boston subway stops, and authorities were investigating. New York police deployed extra security to landmarks, Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House was closed to foot traffic, and the Pentagon tightened security. Federal authorities briefly grounded flights at the Boston airport as a precaution.

The race is a signature event in Boston and has been run since 1897 on Patriots Day, the third Monday in April. Tens of thousands of spectators turn out each year to watch.

Race organizers said that almost 27,000 runners competed, representing 96 countries. The winners were Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia for the men and Rita Jeptoo of Kenya for the women. A special marker at the 26th mile of the course, yards from the finish, had been set up to honor the 26 dead in the Newtown, Conn., elementary school shooting last December.

The elite men began running at 10 a.m., and the explosions were reported just before 3 p.m. The winners had long ago completed the race — Desisa finished with a time of just over 2 hours, 10 minutes — but the explosions came as masses of other runners were approaching the finish. NBC affiliate WHDH said that storefront windows nearby were blown out.

“Right now I’m in my condo with about 50-60 people I picked up off the street including marathon runners. Setting up a camp,” Corey Griffin told NBC News. “They have nowhere to go because everything is shut down. Officials said to get inside. This is crazy.”

Evan Kohlmann, a terrorism analyst for NBC News, said that authorities would probably examine residue from the blasts to determine their type.

Adding that it was premature to identify a culprit, he said: “If this was a deliberate act, unfortunately it certainly would reflect something that we’re seeing. There’s an emphasis on these soft targeted attacks now. We’re moving away from the spectacular attacks and we’re moving into the small grade, homegrown attacks.”

Will Ritter, the spokesman for Massachusetts Senate candidate Gabriel Gomez, who was running the race, told NBC News that he heard what sounded like two explosions and saw smoke rising near the Boston Public Library. He said that he saw three fire engines and police running to the site.

“We heard two really large explosions in rapid succession, about a second apart from each other,” Ritter said. “Everybody kind of ducked and hit the ground.”

Another witness told WHDH that it sounded like cannon fire.

The AP reported that runners and race organizers were crying as they fled the scene, and that bloody spectators were carried to medical tents intended for exhausted runners. Runners who were still on the 26.2-mile course were being stopped and directed elsewhere, the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency said. The agency suggested that people trying to reach loved ones use text messaging because of crowded phone lines.

Authorities gave a phone number for people in search of loved ones — 617-635-4520. They encouraged people with information about the blasts to call 1-800-494-TIPS.

___________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, April 15, 2013 --- 4:14 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- Boston police say there's been a third explosion in the city, following two blasts near the finish line of the Boston Marathon that killed two people and injured many others.

Police Commissioner Edward Davis says authorities aren't certain that the explosion at the JFK Library was related to the other blasts, but they're treating them as if they are.

David says there are no injuries stemming from the third explosion.

He urged people to stay indoors and not congregate in large groups.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, April 15, 2013 --- 3:10 p.m.

BOSTON (AP) -- Boston police say two people were killed and 23 people were hurt when a pair of bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

The blasts shattered the end of the race Monday, sending authorities out on the course to carry away the injured while stragglers in the 26.2-mile race were rerouted away from the smoking site.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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BOSTON (AP) -- The Boston Marathon says that bombs caused the two explosions heard at the finish line and that organizers were working with authorities to determine what happened.

Organizers made the announcement on the groups' Facebook page on Monday.

Authorities have headed onto the course to carry away the injured while stragglers in the 26.2-mile race were rerouted away from the site.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, April 15, 2013 --- 3:03 p.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The White House says President Barack Obama has been notified about the explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

The White House says the administration is in contact with state and local authorities and directed his administration to provide whatever assistance is necessary in the investigation and response.

Vice President Joe Biden was on a conference call with gun control activists when staffers turned on televisions in his office Monday to view coverage of the explosions. Biden said during the call that his prayers were with those who suffered injuries.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Posted Monday, April 15, 2013 --- 2:31 p.m.

From NBC News:

Two explosions went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, witnesses told NBC News.

Video from the finish line showed screams and an enormous cloud of white smoke, and about 20 seconds between the explosions. The Associated Press reported that bloody spectators were being carried to a medical tent that had been set up to care for tired runners.

Jackie Bruno, a reporter for New England Cable News, said on Twitter that she saw people’s legs blown off.

“Runners were coming in and saw unspeakable horror,” she said.

Will Ritter, the spokesman for a Massachusetts Senate candidate, told NBC News that he heard what sounded like two explosions and saw smoke rising near the Boston Public Library. He said that he saw three fire engines and police running to the site.

“We heard two really large explosions in rapid succession, about a second apart from each other,” Ritter said. “Everybody kind of ducked and hit the ground.”

Janet Wu, a reporter for NBC affiliate WHDH, told NBC News that she heard two loud explosions.

Massachusetts General Hospital said that it had two patients and was expecting more.

The AP reported that runners and race organizers were crying as they fled the scene.

The Boston police bomb squad was en route. Boston police confirmed there was an incident but did not immediately give details. Police, fire and medical technicians were responding. New England Cable News reported that the emergency response came within seconds.

Federal authorities told NBC News that they had no immediate information.


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