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UPDATE: Bill changing doctor notification law up for vote

UPDATED Thursday, March 20, 2014 --- 5:17 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A Wisconsin state law covering information doctors are required to tell patients would be expanded under a bill up for a vote in the state Assembly.

The Legislature last year changed the law to no longer require doctors to give patients as much information about available alternative treatments.

The bill up for a vote Thursday would expand the "informed consent" law to apply to chiropractors, dentists, podiatrists and optometrists.

The change was made in reaction to a 2012 Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling that said a doctor's "informed consent" duty includes telling a patient about medical tests and treatments that may be appropriate for a patient's symptoms, even if the doctor doesn't believe the patient has the underlying condition or disease.

The bill would go to Gov. Scott Walker if passed

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, December 13, 2013 --- 5:35 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker has signed into law a bill that no longer requires doctors in Wisconsin to give patients as much information about available alternative treatments.

The bill is in reaction to a 2012 Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling that said a doctor's "informed consent" duty includes telling a patient about medical tests and treatments that may be appropriate for a patient's symptoms, even if the doctor doesn't believe the patient has the underlying condition or disease.

The bill Walker signed Friday changes the law from a "reasonable patient standard" to a "reasonable physician standard."

The Wisconsin Medical Society lobbied for the bill and praised Walker's signing it, with the group's president Dr. Timothy McAvoy calling it "a significant victory for preserving our state's high-quality health care environment."

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, October 15, 2013 --- 7:26 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The state Senate has passed a proposal that would no longer require doctors in Wisconsin to give patients as much information about available alternative treatments.

The bill is in reaction to a 2012 Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling that said a doctor's "informed consent" duty includes telling a patient about medical tests and treatments that may be appropriate for a patient's symptoms, even if the doctor doesn't believe the patient has the underlying condition or disease.

The bill would change the law from a "reasonable patient standard" to a "reasonable physician standard."

The measure passed the Assembly in May. The Senate passed a slightly different version, meaning it will have to go back to the Assembly before it goes to Gov. Scott Walker for his consideration.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, October 15, 2013 --- 6:12 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A proposal that would no longer require doctors in Wisconsin to give patients as much information about available alternative treatments is headed for a vote in the Senate.

The measure passed the Assembly in May. If it clears the Senate on Tuesday unchanged, it would then head to Gov. Scott Walker for his consideration.

The bill is in reaction to a 2012 Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling that said a doctor's "informed consent" duty includes telling a patient about medical tests and treatments that may be appropriate for a patient's symptoms, even if the doctor doesn't believe the patient has the underlying condition or disease.

The bill would change the law from a "reasonable patient standard" to a "reasonable physician standard."

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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Posted: Sunday, April 7, 2013 --- 1:57pm

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Doctors wouldn't have to give patients as much information about alternative treatments under a Republican-sponsored bill in the Legislature.

It's a reaction to a Wisconsin Supreme Court ruling that said a doctor's "informed consent" duty includes telling a patient about tests and treatments that may be appropriate for a patient's symptoms -- even if the doctor doesn't believe the patient has the underlying condition or disease.

The ruling stemmed from the case of a man diagnosed with Bell's palsy. His doctor ordered tests to rule out one kind of stroke, but didn't order another that might have detected a different kind of stroke that he suffered 11 days later.

GOP Rep. Jim Ott says expanded consent will increase medical costs. Democrats say it would be a disservice to patients.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


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