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UPDATE: Kenosha casino supporters reveal details of plan

UPDATE: Supporters of a proposed Kenosha casino say they are moving ahead with their plans while they wait for approval from Gov. Scott Walker.

Proposed Hard Rock casino in Kenosha

UPDATED Saturday, May 24, 2014 --- 3:21 p.m.

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) -- Supporters of a proposed Kenosha casino say they are moving ahead with their plans while they wait for approval from Gov. Scott Walker.

If approved, officials say they'll open a temporary casino while construction of the new facility is under way.

The Racine Journal Times reports that some plans for the casino were revealed Friday. The first phase of construction would include more than 400,000 square feet and feature an entertainment venue and retail. It would include 2,700 slot machines, 100 table games and 24 poker games.

The second phase would feature a hotel, spa and pool. The total project is estimated at $810 million.

Walker's administration has commissioned an independent study on the project's economic impact. Walker has until Feb. 19 to approve or deny it.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, April 11, 2014 --- 4:01 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker has received a six-month extension to make a decision on whether to approve a new casino in Kenosha.

Walker's administration announced Friday that the U.S. Department of the Interior approved the governor's request for additional time to decide whether to allow the Menominee tribe to open the $800 million entertainment complex.

The deadline for a decision has been moved from Aug. 23 to Feb. 19. Unless Walker wins re-election in November, his term ends in early January.

The Menominee tribe has been pushing for opening an off-reservation casino for more than 20 years, saying it will help pull their tribal members out of poverty. The tribe wants to build the casino complex on the grounds of the old Dairyland Greyhound dog track in Kenosha.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, March 27, 2014 --- 4:45 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker's administration has agreed to triple to $1.5 million the potential payment to a national law firm hired to help examine whether to allow the Menominee Tribe to open an $800 million casino in Kenosha.

The original contract signed in December capped payments to the Dykema Gossett law firm at $500,000. But an amended contract released Thursday by Walker's administration raises the cap to $1.5 million.

Walker's Department of Administration Secretary Mike Huebsch says the increase in potential payment "reflects the complexity of both the Kenosha casino proposal and its economic impact on Wisconsin."

Huebsch says raising the cap "ensures we will be able to provide accurate, relevant information about the viability of this project."

Walker has not said when he will make a decision.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, February 28, 2014 --- 3:36 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker wants six more months to make a decision on whether to approve the Menominee tribe's Kenosha casino project.

If approved by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Walker wouldn't have to make a decision on the casino until after the November election.

Walker released a letter Friday co-signed by the tribe asking the BIA to extend the original deadline from Aug. 23 to Feb. 19.

Walker and tribal chairwoman Laurie Boivin say in the letter that more time is needed to "develop and analyze independent data, and facilitate discussions with the interested parties."

Walker has said he wouldn't approve the casino unless all 11 tribes agree to it.

But the Ho-Chunk and Forest County Potawatomi tribes have steadfastly opposed the proposal.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Saturday, December 21, 2013 --- 9:12 p.m.

MADISON (AP) -- A top aide says Gov. Scott Walker may postpone deciding whether to approve the Menominee tribe's Kenosha casino project until after he runs for re-election next November.

Administration Secretary Mike Huebsch told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for a Saturday story that the state's attorneys and financial adviser may need more time to examine the tribe's off-reservation project.

He says as the administration's point person on the project, he will engage in "shuttle diplomacy" to negotiate between the Menominee and two tribes that strongly oppose the project.

The paper says Huebsch also opened the door to modifying or dropping the veto power Walker gave each of Wisconsin's 11 tribes.

Ho-Chunk tribe spokesman Collin Price says he's disappointed that the administration would even consider removing the tribes' project veto power.

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UPDATED Monday, November 11, 2013 --- 3:40 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker says he's discouraging parties interested in a proposal to open a casino in Kenosha from contributing to his campaign.

However, the Republican governor is stopping short of saying he would refuse donations from those interested in the project.

Walker spoke Monday after visiting veterans at a Milwaukee hospital.

He has final approval over the Menominee tribe's proposal to open a casino in Kenosha. The Ho-Chunk and Forest County Potawatomi tribes oppose the plan, and Walker has asked his top aide to try to work out a deal between them.

Walker says the best thing the tribes could do with their money is help his staff get the information needed to make a decision. He says TV ads encouraging him to say yes or no are not helpful.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, November 11, 2013 --- 1:17 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker still isn't saying when he will make a decision on whether to approve a new casino in Kenosha.

Walker issued a statement Monday saying he will "invest the time necessary to reach a positive solution for the state."

Walker says as talks continue they will focus on ways to maximize job creation. But he says criteria he set out two years ago, including consensus from all tribes, remains a focus of his administration.

The Ho-Chunk and the Forest County Potawatomi tribes oppose the proposal from the Menominee tribe to open the $800 million casino.

Potawatomi attorney Jeff Crawford says the tribe expects Walker to find the project does not meet his criteria and is not in the best interest of the state.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, November 11, 2013 --- 12:08 p.m.

Governor Walker released the following statement on the ongoing Kenosha casino decision:

"Helping the people of Wisconsin create more jobs is my number one priority. With that in mind, I am directing the Secretary of the Department of Administration to commence extensive discussions with the tribal governments in an effort to maximize job creation in our state.

Our administration will focus on meeting the criteria set out more than two years ago. We want to create jobs without losing jobs in other parts of the state.

The federal Bureau of Indian Affairs took nine years to approve an application for a casino in Kenosha. We will not take that long, but we will invest the time necessary to reach a positive solution for the state.

I would ask that all of the interested parties spend their time and resources working with the state's team at the Department of Administration. This will ensure an objective process."

Statement from Forest County Potawatomi Attorney General Jeff Crawford:

“We appreciate Governor Walker giving a thorough and deliberate evaluation of the Kenosha casino proposal to see if it meets the criteria that he set more than two years ago.

Following his review, we expect that Governor Walker will find that this project does not meet his criteria and is not in the best interests of Wisconsin.”

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UPDATED Monday, November 11, 2013 --- 9:59 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker plans to release a timetable for when he will make a decision either granting or denying the Menominee tribe's request to open a casino in Kenosha.

Walker spokesman Tom Evenson says the statement will come Monday afternoon.

Walker said last week he was trying to find a way to approve the $800 million project in which the Menominee is partnering with Hard Rock International.

Walker has said he won't approve the casino unless all 11 tribes in Wisconsin support it, but so far both the Ho-Chunk and Potawatomi oppose the project, largely because they say it will cut into profits at their casinos and take away jobs.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, November 11, 2013 --- 9:35 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker plans to release a statement Monday about the proposed casino in Kenosha, but it is not clear whether it will actually be his decision granting or denying the Menominee tribe's request.

Walker spokesman Tom Evenson says Walker will be issuing a statement, but he would not say whether it will contain his decision or not.

Walker said last week he was trying to find a way to approve the $800 million project in which the Menominee is partnering with Hard Rock International.

Walker has said he won't approve the casino unless all 11 tribes in Wisconsin support it, but so far both the Ho-Chunk and Potawatomi oppose the project, largely because they say it will cut into profits at their casinos and take away jobs.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Saturday, November 9, 2013 --- 4:52 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The Oneida tribe would collect at least $3 million a year in banking fees in exchange for its support of the proposed Menominee casino in Kenosha.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports (http://bit.ly/16QcQ8r ) the agreement also gives the Oneida tribe the first chance to help finance the first phase of the casino, which the Menominee tribe hopes to build with help from Hard Rock International.

The Menominee are promising in return not to advertise the Kenosha casino in broadcast markets north of Milwaukee, or in daily papers or on billboards in the Green-Bay-Appleton market. That's to avoid competing with the Oneida tribe's casino near Green Bay.

Gov. Scott Walker has said he'll approve the Kenosha casino only if all Wisconsin tribes support it. Two tribes are currently opposed to it.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, November 7, 2013 --- 1:28 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker isn't saying when he will make his decision on the Kenosha casino, but he's hopeful to have something to announce "in the next couple days."

Walker was asked Thursday about where he stands on whether to grant or reject the Menominee tribe's proposal along with Hard Rock International to open a new casino complex in Kenosha.

Walker says legally he could take up to a year to decide. He says he doesn't think it will take that long, but he is going to take the time necessary to explore ways to maximize the potential for creating jobs with the project.

The Ho-Chunk and Potawatomi tribes oppose the project, largely because they say it will cut into profits at their casinos and take away jobs.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, November 7, 2013 --- 9:30 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The wait for Gov. Scott Walker's decision on the Kenosha casino continues, with no announcement expected Thursday and perhaps not even this week.

Walker's spokesman Tom Evenson says the governor is not expected to announce his decision on Thursday. Evenson says Walker "continues to review the Menominee's proposal, and no decision has been made."

Walker said last week he hoped to make his decision this week. But Evenson says on Thursday that he may not decide by Friday and "there is no timeframe for a decision."

Earlier in the week Walker said he was looking at creative ways to move the project forward.

Walker has said he won't approve it unless all tribes agree. The Ho-Chunk and Potawatomi tribes have been steadfastly opposed to the project.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, November 6, 2013 --- 9:23 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker still isn't saying what his decision will be on approving a new casino in Kenosha.

Walker spokesman Tom Evenson says the governor is not expected to make an announcement Wednesday.

Walker has said he intends to make his decision known sometime this week, but he's set deadlines before and pushed them back. Earlier this week Walker said he was looking for a "creative way to move this forward" and finding a way to balance concerns brought by opponents of the project.

Walker has consistently said that all 11 Wisconsin tribes must support the Menominee's proposed off-reservation casino. But the Ho-Chunk and Potawatomi have been steadfastly against it.

Supporters say the project will create jobs and boost the state's economy, while opponents say those promises are overblown.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, November 5, 2013 --- 2:35 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Opponents and backers of a new Kenosha casino are making their case as Gov. Scott Walker considers whether to approve the project.

Menominee chairman Craig Corn and said at a Tuesday news conference that approval of a casino in Kenosha will help pull his tribe out of poverty.

Corn says the tribe has been working with Walker to find a pathway for him to approve the project that's been in the works for two decades. Corn says, "We are ready to do whatever it takes to come to an irresistible offer."

Opponents of the project, including representatives of national tea party groups, say building the casino will only empower private unions who will in turn organize to defeat Walker.

Walker is expected to announce his decision this week.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, November 5, 2013 --- 12:03 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Menominee chairman Craig Corn says approval of a casino in Kenosha will help pull his tribe out of poverty.

Corn and members of the tribe gathered at the state Capitol on Tuesday to continue their call on Gov. Scott Walker to approve the off-reservation casino. Opponents of the casino were holding their own event later Tuesday.

Corn says the tribe has been working with Walker to find a pathway for him to approve the project that's been in the works for two decades. Corn says, "We are ready to do whatever it takes to come to an irresistible offer."

Walker is expected to announce his decision this week, but his spokesman Tom Evenson says it likely will not come on Tuesday.

The Ho-Chunk and Potawatomi tribes oppose the Kenosha casino.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, November 5, 2013 --- 5:36 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Opponents and supporters of a proposed casino in Kenosha both plan to rally at the state Capitol on Tuesday.

One event is organized by tea party groups and other conservative organizations to urge Gov. Scott Walker to reject the proposal from the Menominee tribe and Hard Rock International for the casino.

Those organizing the rally say they intend to voice their concerns that the casino will cost the state jobs and generate money for union members who may work to build and staff the casino.

Members of the Menominee tribe also planned to hold an event to encourage Walker to allow the casino to open. They argue the project is good for the state's economy.

Walker was expected to announce his decision this week.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, November 4, 2013 --- 9:07 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker is not expected to announce his decision Monday on the fate of a proposed new casino and Hard Rock International entertainment center in Kenosha.

Walker's spokesman Tom Evenson says in an email that the governor is still reviewing the proposal from the Menominee tribe and Hard Rock International and no decision is expected Monday.

Walker met with tribal and Hard Rock leaders last month and has been mulling his decision ever since. Walker has said that all tribes in Wisconsin must agree on opening the casino, but the Ho-Chunk Nation and the Forest County Potawatomi, which operate their own lucrative casinos in Wisconsin, have repeatedly said they oppose competition in Kenosha.

Casino opponents scheduled a rally Tuesday at the Capitol to urge Walker to reject the proposal.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, November 1, 2013 --- 3:39 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker is questioning whether the opening of a new casino in Kenosha would meet his requirement that there be no new net gambling in the state.

The Menominee tribe argues there would be no increase because it plans to close a small casino on reservation land and the new one would be located at the closed Dairyland Greyhound Park.

Walker emphasizes in a statement Friday that the new casino is projected to generate about $454 million a year and have 3,100 slot machines. Dairyland made about $20 million annually at its height and the reservation casino has only 30 slot machines.

Walker asks, "Do these two smaller operations actually offset the increase in gambling in the much larger proposed casino?"

Walker's decision is expected next week.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, October 31, 2013 --- 10:56 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Republican and Democratic lawmakers are joining together with laborers and others to urge Gov. Scott Walker to approve the Menominee tribe's plan for a new casino in Kenosha.

Supporters of the project gathered Thursday at a state Capitol news conference to tout the promised creation of thousands of temporary and permanent jobs at the project. The tribe is partnering with Hard Rock International.

Walker is deciding whether to allow the casino or side with the Potawatomi and Ho-Chunk tribes which are urging him to reject it. Walker says he could make his decision as early as next week.

Assembly Democratic Minority Leader Peter Barca of Kenosha says he believes the project can be a win-win for Wisconsin.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, October 30, 2013 --- 9:03 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A coalition of business leaders, public officials and members of Wisconsin's construction industry is coming to Madison to urge Gov. Scott Walker to approve a new casino in Kenosha.

The group plans a news conference Thursday at the state Capitol to emphasize jobs the casino would create and the budget benefits for state and local governments.

Walker is reviewing various issues as he decides whether to grant the Menominee Nation's plans for the off-reservation casino.

In his daily update Wednesday, Walker discussed community support, one of those factors.

The Republican governor notes voters in Kenosha County in 2004 passed a referendum supporting a casino, and the City of Kenosha did the same in 1998.

Walker also cited votes opposing the casino by the Milwaukee County Board and Milwaukee City Council.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, October, 29, 2013 --- 4:08 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker says he hopes to make a decision on whether to allow the Menominee to open a new casino in Kenosha within a week.

Walker said Tuesday he's not setting any firm deadlines. He says given that the fight over the casino has been going on for about 20 years, a couple more days won't matter.

Walker this week is highlighting different issues he's considering as he mulls his decision. He says that the debate over what impact a new casino would have on job creation is one area he's looking closely at.

Walker says he wants to make sure he's done his due diligence in looking at all the issues and ensure that people understand where he's coming from once he decides.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, October 29, 2013 --- 12:34 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker says the debate over what impact a new casino in Kenosha would have on jobs in southeastern Wisconsin is part of the reason why he is taking longer to make a decision.

Walker highlighted the jobs issue in a release Tuesday, the second in what he promises will be a series.

Walker has not said when he will decide whether the Menominee can open the casino. That tribe argues the new casino will lead to the creation of more than 3,300 permanent jobs.

But Walker says the issue is cloudy because the Forest County Potawatomi, the Ho-Chunk and Milwaukee officials have presented other information showing job losses and a loss of money for the tribes at their existing casinos.

Both of those tribes oppose the Kenosha casino.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, October 28, 2013 --- 3:12 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker is promising a daily update on issues he's considering as he decides whether to grant the Menominee Nation's plans for an off-reservation casino in Kenosha.

Walker planned to make a decision last week but announced on Friday he would give himself more time. He said in a statement Monday that the Menominee gave him volumes of information on the project and wants to review it thoroughly. He says he'll announce the issues he's considering in a daily email to the public.

On Monday he said he asked the Department of Administration to find out whether anyone is planning to open a new casino in Illinois if the Kenosha facility falls through. The agency says no tribal applications are pending with federal officials for any Illinois facilities.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Updated Friday, October 25, 2013 --- 8:42 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker has delayed his announcement on whether he will approve the Menominee Nation's new casino in Kenosha.

Walker spokesman Tom Evenson said Friday that the governor won't announce his decision Friday as originally planned. He says Walker needs more time to review information the Menominee submitted.

Walker wants all of the state's tribes to approve the $800 million casino before he will allow it. Two tribes, the Ho-Chunk and Potawatomi, have steadfastly opposed it.

Menominee Chairman Craig Corn says he's glad Walker is doing his due diligence.

But Ho-Chunk President Jon Greendeer says the governor should make a decision quickly so all the tribes can move on and delaying the announcement gives the Menominee false hope. A Potawatomi spokesman didn't immediately return a message.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Updated Wednesday, October 23, 2013 --- 11:57 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Menominee tribe and Hard Rock International leaders say they told Gov. Scott Walker they have met his criteria to approve a new casino in Kenosha.

Walker plans to announce his decision by the end of the week.

Menominee Chairman Craig Corn says Walker did not indicate during the meeting whether he would approve their plans to open an $800 million entertainment complex at the old Dairyland Greyhound dog track in Kenosha.

Corn says he expects there to be an ongoing dialogue with Walker's administration this week.

Walker is requiring that all Wisconsin tribes approve of the deal, but the Ho-Chunk and Potawatomie remain opposed.

Walker's spokeswoman issued a statement saying only that the governor is expected to make his decision later this week.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Updated Wednesday, October 23, 2013 --- 10:00 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker is meeting with officials from the Menominee tribe and Hard Rock International about their proposal to open a new casino in Kenosha just two days before the governor says he plans to make a decision about the project.

The tribe submitted its proposal to Walker on Tuesday. It planned to release those documents at a Wednesday news conference following its closed-door meeting with Walker.

Walker has said he will only approve the casino if Wisconsin's other 10 tribes agree to it. But the Potawatomi and the Ho-Chunk, both of which operate lucrative casinos in the state, are opposed to letting the Menominee open one in Kenosha.

Walker has said he will make his decision by the end of the week.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, October 22, 2013 --- 1:40 p.m.

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker says he might make a decision by the end of the week on whether the Menominee Nation's plans for an off-reservation casino in Kenosha can proceed.

Walker has said his approval hinges on three criteria -- no net increase in gambling, community support and approval from the state's 10 other tribes. The Forest County Potawatomi and the Ho-Chunk Nation oppose the project.

Walker has given the Menominee until Tuesday to reach a consensus. A Department of Administration spokeswoman says Walker plans to meet with the Menominee on Wednesday.

WLUK-TV initially reported the governor extended the deadline for tribal consensus but later corrected that report.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, October 22, 2013 --- 10:58 a.m.

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) -- A television station is reporting that Gov. Scott Walker has extended his deadline for Wisconsin's tribes to approve the Menominee Nation's plans for an $800 million off-reservation casino in Kenosha.

Walker has said his approval hinges on three criteria -- the new casino can't create any net increase in gambling, there must be community support and all of the state's tribes must approve of it. The Forest County Potawatomi and the Ho-Chunk Nation oppose the project.

A 60-day period Walker gave the Menominee to build tribal consensus expires Tuesday. But the governor told WLUK-TV on Monday that he is extending the deadline to the end of the week.

A Department of Administration spokeswoman didn't immediately return messages from The Associated Press on Tuesday morning.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, October 21, 2013 --- 5:52 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Time is almost up for the Menominee Nation to make the case for a new off-reservation casino to Gov. Scott Walker.

The Menominee want to open a casino in Kenosha. The federal government has signed off on the project but Walker has yet to give his permission. The governor says he'll approve the casino only if the Menominee can show the project has community support, won't result in a net increase in gambling and the state's other 10 tribes agree.

The Forest County Potawatomi, which operates a casino in Milwaukee, and the Ho-Chunk Nation both oppose the plan.

Walker has given the Menominee until Tuesday to show they've met the criteria.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, October 18, 2013 --- 7:50 a.m.

ONEIDA, Wis. (AP) -- The Menominee's casino proposal has the support of an additional American Indian tribe in Wisconsin.

The Oneida Nation has signed off on the Kenosha casino, leaving the Potawatomi and Ho-Chunk as the only tribes that haven't given the project their backing.

Gov. Scott Walker has said the Menominee will need the support Wisconsin's 10 other tribes to win his approval.

The Menominee want to partner with Hard Rock International to build an $800 million casino and entertainment complex at the old Dairyland Greyhound dog track in Kenosha.

WLUK-TV reports Oneida chairman Edward Delgado says the decision to support the Menominee project came after studying casino revenue and visitor information.

Walker has given the Menominee until Tuesday to show it has support from all the tribes.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, October 17, 2013 --- 9:21 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Menominee Nation's chairman says he's confidant the tribe can craft an agreement on their proposed casino in Kenosha that Gov. Scott Walker would approve.

Craig Corn told the Kenosha News after Walker met with him as well as Potawatomi, Oneida and Ho-Chunk leaders Wednesday that the Menominee can come up with some way to offset those tribes' potential revenue losses.

Corn says the governor said he wants the tribe to address those concerns. He says he'll respond by next week.

Walker has said he won't approve the casino unless the community supports it, it doesn't result in any net increase in gambling and the state's 10 other tribes approve it. The Ho-Chunk and the Potawatomi oppose the project.

A Walker spokesman didn't immediately return a message Thursday.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, October 16, 2013 --- 7:54 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker says he has re-affirmed his criteria for approving the Menominee Nation's plans for an off-reservation casino in Kenosha with tribal leaders.

A state Department of Administration spokeswoman released a statement saying Walker and DOA Secretary Mike Huebsch met with Menominee, Potowatomi, Ho-Chunk and Oneida leaders about the casino on Wednesday. She says Walker reiterated his criteria for approving the plans -- community support, no net increase in gambling and support from all 11 Wisconsin tribes. The statement offered no other details.

The Ho-Chunk and the Potawatomi oppose the Menominee's plans. Spokesmen for the Menominee and Potawatomi didn't immediately return messages. Messages left at the Ho-Chunk and Oneida tribal offices weren't immediately returned.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, October 10, 2013 --- 12:54 p.m.

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) -- Hard Rock International wants to develop and manage a proposed Menominee Indian casino in Kenosha if the project gets the green light.

Hard Rock and tribe officials held a news conference at the proposed site, the former Dairyland Greyhound park, on Thursday.

Menominee tribal chairman Craig Corn says bringing the Hard Rock brand to the project elevates the excitement about the proposed off-reservation casino.

The Menominee tribe is trying to persuade Gov. Scott Walker to approve the casino. Walker says approval hinges on a consensus from Wisconsin's other tribes, among other things. The Ho-Chunk Nation and the Forest County Potawatomi, which already operate casinos, have objected to the proposal.

The Seminole tribe in Florida purchased the Hard Rock corporation in 2007. It owns 179 venues in 57 countries, including 8 casinos.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, October 10, 2013 --- 10:08 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Menominee Nation is planning to hold a news conference to announce a new partnership in its efforts to bring an off-reservation casino to Kenosha.

Menominee officials have scheduled the news conference for noon Thursday at the former Dairyland Greyhound Park, where the tribe hopes to build the casino. Tribal spokesman Evan Zeppos declined to comment ahead of the news conference, saying only that Hard Rock International Chief Executive Officer James Allen is expected to attend.

The Menominee are trying to persuade Gov. Scott Walker to green-light the casino. Walker says approval hinges on new net gambling, community support and consensus from Wisconsin's other tribes. The Ho-Chunk Nation and the Forest County Potawatomi both have objected to the proposal.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, September 12, 2013 --- 3:40 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Eight of the 11 federally recognized American Indian tribes in Wisconsin say they support the Menominee tribe's attempt to build a new casino in Kenosha.

The Menominee issued a press release on Thursday saying they had the support of all but three of the state's tribes for the project. They urged Gov. Scott Walker to approve building the casino.

Walker has said he won't approve it unless there is unanimous consensus among all 11 tribes.

The three tribes that did not sign Thursday's statement were the Ho-Chunk Nation, Forest County Potawatomi, and the Oneida Tribe.

The Potawatomi operate a casino just 40 miles away from Kenosha in Milwaukee and have vehemently opposed the Menominee's plans.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, September 5, 2013 --- 5:06 p.m.

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) -- The Menominee tribe is airing a television ad urging Gov. Scott Walker to approve an off-reservation casino in Kenosha.

The tribe unveiled the 30-second spot Friday. The Menominee say the ad was shot on location in Kenosha County and features unscripted interviews with area residents.

Tribal officials have promised the $800 million casino would create thousands of jobs and boost southeastern Wisconsin's economy.

The proposed casino won federal approval last month. Walker has final say.

Menominee Tribal Chairman Craig Corn says the ad is part of a campaign that includes Facebook, Twitter and a website.

The Forest County Potawatomi tribe strongly opposes the project. That tribe runs a casino in Milwaukee about 40 miles north of Kenosha and contends the Menominee's job creation claims are exaggerated.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, September 5, 2013 --- 3:34 p.m.

RACINE, Wis. (AP) -- The Racine County executive is publicly endorsing a new tribal casino proposed for Kenosha.

County Executive Jim Ladwig joined members of the Menominee tribe at a news conference Thursday to announce his support.

Ladwig urged state lawmakers to endorse the $800 million casino project and the 500 county jobs promised along with it.

The Journal Times reports Ladwig said he has received assurances from the Menominee tribe that 15 percent of casino workers will come from Racine County.

Gov. Scott Walker needs to sign off on a proposal by Menominee Nation leaders for an off-reservation casino in Kenosha.

The Forest County Potawatomi tribe strongly opposes the project. That tribe runs a casino in Milwaukee about 40 miles north of Kenosha and doesn't want to compete with the Menominee.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, August 28, 2013 --- 1:59 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin state Senate's president is questioning Gov. Scott Walker's criteria for approving a new tribal casino.

The Menominee Nation got federal approval last week to build an $800 million, off-reservation casino in Kenosha. Walker, a Republican, has the final say on the project. The governor has said he would grant approval only if the project results in no new net gambling, the community supports it and the state's other 10 tribes approve. The Forest County Potawatomi, which run a casino in Milwaukee just north of the Kenosha site, are vehemently opposed to the new casino.

Senate President Mike Ellis, a Neenah Republican, calls Walker's standards a curious contradiction to the free enterprise system. He likened Walker's standards to giving Menards the ability to block a new Fleet Farm store.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, August 27, 2013 --- 12:06 p.m.
Posted Tuesday, August 27, 2013 --- 10:51 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Supporters of plans for a tribal casino in Kenosha are pressing Gov. Scott Walker to green-light the project.

The Menominee Nation wants to open an off-reservation casino at the former Dairyland Greyhound Park dog track. Federal officials approved the plan last week but Walker must sign off before anything can happen.

Walker has said his approval hinges on no new net gaming, community support and consensus among the state's tribes. The Forest County Potawatomi, which operates a casino in Milwaukee, opposes the Menominee's plans.

Menominee leaders, southeastern Wisconsin legislators and labor leaders held a press conference at the state Capitol on Tuesday calling on Walker to approve the plans. They say the casino will create thousands of jobs and alleviate poverty on the Menominee's reservation in northeastern Wisconsin.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


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