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UPDATE: Wis. agriculture officials warn of cattle disease

UPDATED Friday, October 4, 2013 --- 9:36 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Agriculture officials are warning farmers to watch for signs of a cattle disease that can cause fever and lameness after two cases were found in Wisconsin.

The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection says epizootic hemorrhagic disease, or EHD, is unlikely to kill cattle. But its symptoms include fever, ulcers in the mouth, a swollen tongue, excessive salivation, and lameness or stiffness when walking.

DATCP spokeswoman Raechelle Cline said Friday that samples from two infected animals were submitted for tests in September. A rapid test done by a state lab identified the disease, and tests for confirmation are pending at a federal lab.

This is the first year that EHD in cattle has been reported in Wisconsin. The disease does not infect humans.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Updated Friday, October 4, 2013 --- 6:11 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Agriculture officials are warning farmers to be on the lookout for signs of a cattle disease that can cause fever and lameness after two cases were found in Wisconsin.

The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection says epizootic hemorrhagic disease, or EHD, is unlikely to kill cattle. But its symptoms include fever, ulcers in the mouth, a swollen tongue, excessive salivation, and lameness or stiffness when walking.

Dr. Paul McGraw, the state veterinarian, said in a statement Thursday that the disease remains a threat until a hard freeze kills the insects that spread the virus. EHD does not infect humans.

One concern is that EHD's symptoms are similar to foot-and-mouth disease, so officials want to make sure animals are tested to rule out the more serious illness.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Posted Thursday, October 3, 2013 --- 4:53 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Animal health officials are urging Wisconsin cattle farmers to take preventive measures against a disease recently confirmed in cattle in the state.

The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection says two cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease, or EHD, were confirmed in state cattle.

EHD is commonly transmitted by biting midges and black flies. The disease primarily affects deer but also can infect cattle.

State Veterinarian Paul McGraw says until there's a hard freeze that kills the midges and flies, EHD will remain a threat to cattle. McGraw recommends farmers use insect control to eliminate midges and flies.

EHD in cattle is rare, but can happen when conditions support insect growth. Signs include fever, ulcers in the mouth and gums, and lameness or stiffness when walking.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


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