NBC15 WMTV | Madison, WI | News

UPDATE: Temple Shooter Used Internet to Further Beliefs

UPDATED Tuesday, May 14, 2913 --- 10:14 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Federal court documents show the man who killed six people at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin was actively using the Internet to become increasingly radical in his white supremacist beliefs in the months before the shooting.

An unsealed FBI search warrant reveals that federal agents quickly collected evidence of Wade Michael Page's connections to white power groups. The documents say Page became increasingly interested in conspiracy theories and videos online. The warrant doesn't say what Page was viewing, but that it disturbed his girlfriend, Misty Cook.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports the documents say Page was typical of others who use the Internet to become increasingly radical. The FBI eventually concluded Page acted alone in the shooting rampage and that there was no evidence a white supremacist group was involved.

Page also injured four people before killing himself.

_________________________________________________

UPDATED: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 --- 7:52 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Authorities say the white supremacist who killed six people at a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee this summer had no drugs in his system when he committed the assaults.

A Milwaukee County toxicology report released Wednesday says Wade Michael Page had a small amount of alcohol in his system, but the medical examiner's office says alcohol is sometimes a by-product of decomposition, and it's unclear whether Page had been drinking before the Aug. 5 attack.

The report says the 40-year-old shooter had no hard drugs in his system.

Page killed six Sikh worshipers before killing himself. FBI officials say he acted alone and that his motive remains unclear.

An autopsy report says Page's many tattoos included skulls and crossbones on one forearm and the word "Suffer" across his shoulders.

Copyright 2012: Associated Press

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

UPDATED Tuesday, November 20, 2012 --- 4:11 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The FBI has concluded a white supremacist who killed six people at a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee acted alone.

Teresa Carlson, the special agent in charge of the FBI's Milwaukee office, announced Tuesday the agency has finished its probe into the shooting and found no evidence shooter Wade Michael Page had help or was carrying out any orders from any white supremacist group. She says nothing suggests the attack was part of any ongoing threat to the Sikh community.

Page walked into the temple in Oak Creek and shot six people to death before police killed him in a shootout.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

_________________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, October 17, 2012 --- 4:15 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- A Sikh priest injured in an August shooting rampage at his Milwaukee-area temple has been transferred from the hospital to a long-term care facility.

The family of Punjab Singh said in a statement Wednesday that he still requires around-the-clock care. They say they've made arrangements to transfer him to a health facility where he'll receive that care.

Singh was among four people wounded and six people killed in the Aug. 5 attack. The FBI says it may never know why the gunman opened fire before eventually committing suicide after being wounded by police.

Singh was shot in the head and remained in a coma for months. It wasn't immediately clear whether the 65-year-old had regained consciousness, as the family declined to discuss his condition.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

__________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, September 10, 2012 --- 3:45 p.m.

From WITI-TV:

OAK CREEK — Oak Creek police and Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm released on Monday, September 10th police dash cam videos taken the day of the Sikh Temple shooting, Sunday, August 5th.

Officials released two clips of video — about three to four minutes in length. The first was dash cam video from Lt. Brian Murphy’s squad. It shows Lt. Murphy arriving on the scene. He exits his squad and checks on two victims from the temple. Moments later, he notices Wade Page walking around the parking lot with what appears to be a gun. Page fires upon Murphy and he is struck.

New information indicates 15 rounds were fired upon Lt. Murphy. Officials say 12 of the rounds struck Lt. Murphy; the other three struck his protective vest.

The second clip shows dash cam video from the squad of Oak Creek Police Officer Sam Lenda. It shows Lenda pulling up on the scene at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin. He saw Page running around in the parking lot at the Sikh Temple and backed off. After assessing the situation, Officer Lenda grabbed his squad rifle. Page had been firing upon Lenda’s squad — and even struck the windshield. Moments later, Lenda fired his squad rifle at Page, striking the suspect. Lenda indicated he fired six rounds.

The shooting at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin on August 5th left six dead and three critically wounded. The six victims of temple shooting are identified as — Sita Singh, 41; Ranjit Singh, 49; temple president Satwant Singh Kaleka, 65; Prakash Singh, 39, and Suveg Singh, 84 — and 41-year-old Paramjit Kaur.

The man at the center of the shooting is 40-year-old Wade Page. He died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head in the moments after he shot up the temple — following a gunshot wound to the stomach fired by Officer Lenda.

__________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, September 10, 2012 --- 7:50 a.m.

OAK CREEK, Wis. (AP) -- Police in suburban Milwaukee plan to release video that could show the final moments of life for the gunman who killed six worshippers at a Sikh temple last month.

The video is from squad car dashboard cameras. Oak Creek police plan to release portions Monday afternoon.

The FBI has said there's video showing an officer taking down gunman Wade Michael Page with a remarkable gunshot to the abdomen from 75 feet away. However, it's not clear whether that footage will be released. Police are withholding or pixelating images that are especially graphic.

Page killed six people and wounded three others, including one of the first officers to respond. Page later killed himself.

The video is being released in response to an open-records request by The Associated Press and others.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

__________________________________________

UPDATED: Wednesday, September 5, 2012 --- 4:50p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Hospital officials in Milwaukee have upgraded the condition of the Sikh worshipper who'd been in critical condition for weeks following last month's shooting rampage at a nearby temple.

A Froedtert Hospital spokeswoman said Wednesday that Punjab Singh is now in serious condition. He no longer needs mechanical support to breathe and he's out of intensive care.

The 65-year-old was injured Aug. 5 when a gunman opened fire at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek. Six people were killed, and Singh was one of three worshippers injured. One person was treated on the same day for minor injuries, and the other was released 10 days later.

Singh's family members flew from India to be with him. They spend most of their waking hours at his bedside.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

__________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, September 5, 2012 --- 2:53 p.m.

OAK CREEK, Wis. (AP) -- Officials at a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee are treading carefully as they figure out how to distribute hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations that poured in after last month's deadly shooting rampage.

The donations are expected to total between $500,000 and $600,000. Money will be given to families of the six worshippers killed and the two injured.

However, deciding who gets how much money can lead to in-fighting, as has happened elsewhere.

So temple leaders sought the advice of a consultant who directed victims' payments after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Ken Feinberg recommended that all the dead victims' survivors get equal amounts, even though one victim was 84. He says that's fairest.

Temple officials say they'll proceed slowly to make sure all parties are treated justly.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

__________________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, August 30, 2012 --- 10:40 a.m.

OAK CREEK, Wis. (AP) -- The family of Sikh priest Punjab Singh says he has remained in a coma ever since the Aug. 5 shooting at a Wisconsin temple that left six people dead and three others injured.

His family told The Associated Press in an exclusive interview this week that they rushed from India to be with him after the shooting. Now they spend most of their waking hours at his hospital bedside.

The three other people who were wounded in the rampage are out of the hospital.

Singh's sons smiled Wednesday as they shared stories of their father's lifelong efforts to clothe and educate poor children in India. Forty-four-year-old Raghuvinder Singh of New Delhi says he takes comfort in the knowledge that his father's fate is now in God's hands.

------

Online:

To donate to relief efforts: http://www.wearesikhs.com

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

__________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, August 28, 2012 --- 11:03 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- A sister of the man who killed six Sikh worshippers before shooting himself tells investigators he had a history of alcohol problems.

The sister was quoted in an investigation report released Tuesday by the Milwaukee County medical examiner's office. She told investigators that Wade Michael Page seemed bloated over the past few months, and she wondered if he had been drinking recently.

Toxicology reports are still pending.

The sister also noted that Page's demeanor had changed over the past year. She said he'd become more intense and apparently lost his wit and sense of humor.

Page opened fire at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek on Aug. 5. He killed six people and injured four others before shooting himself.

His death has officially been ruled a suicide.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

__________________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, August 23, 2012 --- 4:23 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- First lady Michelle Obama is meeting with families of those killed and wounded earlier this month in the shooting at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin.

Temple official Kulwant Singh Dhaliwal says Obama offered her sympathies Thursday for the Aug. 5 tragedy. He says her appearance is a "wonderful gesture."

She met with families in a hallway of the Oak Creek high school.

Dahaliwal says Sikhs have taken comfort in the knowledge the shooting has at least helped them educate the world about their religion.

Amardeep Kaleka is the son of the temple president, one of six people killed. Kaleka says his father is educating more people about Sikhism in death than he could in life.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

_____________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, August 23, 2012 --- 7:20 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- First lady Michelle Obama is scheduled to meet with relatives of those killed and injured in a Sikh temple shooting in suburban Milwaukee earlier this month.

Sikh leaders say they're grateful for the visit, set for Thursday afternoon. They also say they've taken comfort in the knowledge that the shooting has at least helped them educate the world about their religion.

Amardeep Kaleka is the son of the temple president, one of six people killed. Kaleka says his father is educating more people about Sikhism in death than he could in life.

Inderjeet Singh Dhillon is one of the temple leaders. He says Sikhs pray for God to give peace to everyone, regardless of religion. He says recent media attention has helped Sikhs spread that message of peace.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, August 22, 2012 --- 4:45 p.m.

Lt. Brian Murphy has been released from the hospital. Meanwhile, Punjab Singh remains hospitalized in Critical condition.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED: Wednesday, August 15, 2012 --- 8:49p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- One of the three victims hospitalized after a mass shooting at a Wisconsin Sikh temple has been released.

The three men were being treated at Froedtert Hospital in Milwaukee. Hospital spokeswoman Kathy Sieja says 50-year-old Santokh Singh was released Wednesday.

Two others are still hospitalized. Sixty-five-year-old Punjab Singh is in critical condition, and Oak Creek Police Lt. Brian Murphy is in satisfactory condition.

The three were wounded Aug. 5 when a gunman fired on worshippers at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek. Six people were killed.

A fourth woman suffered a minor injury when she was grazed by a bullet.

The shooter was white supremacist Wade Michael Page. He killed himself after being wounded in a shootout with police. His motive remains unknown.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, August 15, 2012 --- 12:45 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Gunfire can be heard on recordings of 911 calls from the shooting that killed six worshippers at a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee.

Milwaukee County authorities on Wednesday released tapes from the Aug. 5 shooting at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek.

One man calls and reports the address of the temple. As he says, "There's a shooting," the sound of gunfire can be heard in the background.

Another woman calls to report hearing gunfire and seeing someone shot. The call gets disconnected, and the dispatcher calls back twice with no luck.

At one point, with phones ringing nonstop, a dispatcher says, "Oh my god."

White supremacist Wade Michael Page opened fire at the temple before shooting himself in the head after being wounded by an officer.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Friday, August 10, 2012 --- 8:00 a.m.

OAK CREEK, Wis. (AP) -- The son of one of the six Sikh Oak Creek temple members killed in a shooting rampage says there's a more positive spirit inside the temple now that it has been cleaned by worshippers.

Amardeep Kaleka, son of temple president Satwant Singh Kaleka, was among those who returned to the temple Thursday where Sikh men painted walls and shampooed carpets while women gathered in the kitchen to prepare a communal meal. A small group of worshippers gathered at the back of the temple hall for an impromptu service. They chanted the holy scriptures and ate prashad, a mixture of wheat and butter.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (http://tinyurl.com/cvy9rl4 ) says as Sikh men and women worked in the temple, small children ran around the entrance hall laughing, oblivious to the carnage that had taken place there just days before.

------

Information from: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, http://www.jsonline.com

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, August 8, 2012 --- 12:13 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The FBI's top official in Milwaukee says the arrest of an ex-girlfriend of the gunman who killed six people at a Sikh temple wasn't connected to the slayings.

Agent Teresa Carlson said Wednesday that Misty Cook was arrested on a weapons violation Sunday after investigators interviewed her. But federal officials say Cook is not connected to the shootings, has been cooperative with authorities and was quickly released.

Milwaukee County sheriff's spokeswoman Fran McLaughlin says the 31-year-old Cook also went by Brenda Cook. Online court records show Brenda Cook pleaded no contest in 2005 to a felony charge of fleeing an officer.

Authorities have identified the temple shooter as Wade Michael Page. Neighbors say he and Cook broke up this past spring.

Copyright 2012: Associated Press

___________________________________________________

UPDATED: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 --- 10:45 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The FBI's top official in Milwaukee says the arrest of an ex-girlfriend of the man who fatally shot six people at a Sikh temple is not connected to the slayings.

Special Agent in Charge Teresa Carlson said during a briefing Wednesday at FBI offices in Milwaukee that Misty Cook was arrested on a weapons violation after investigators interviewed her. But, federal officials say she has been cooperative and has since been released.

Authorities have identified the gunman as Wade Michael Page. Carlson says Page shot himself in the head after he was shot in the body by one of the first officers to arrive at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin Sunday.

Copyright 2012: Associated Press

___________________________________________________

UPDATED: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 --- 10:40 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The FBI says the motive behind the shootings at a Sikh temple that left six worshipers dead remains unknown but authorities still haven't identified anyone other than the gunman as being responsible.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Teresa Carlson also told a Wednesday news conference that investigators determined gunman Wade Michael Page died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head after he was shot by police. Authorities previously said an officer had fired the fatal shot.

Carlson says federal officials had not opened any investigation into Page before Sunday's shooting. She says investigators are interviewing dozens of people who have known Page as they work to determine for a possible motive.

Copyright 2012: Associated Press

___________________________________________________

UPDATED: Wednesday, August 8, 2012 --- 10:25 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The FBI now says the gunman in the Wisconsin Sikh temple shootings died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head after he was shot by police.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Teresa Carlson told a Wednesday news conference that investigators also have not yet "clearly defined a motive" for Sunday shooting at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin that left six worshipers dead.

Copyright 2012: Associated Press

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, August 8, 2012 --- 7:15 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The FBI says it will provide an update on its investigation into the fatal shooting at a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee.

The agent in charge of the Milwaukee division, Teresa Carlson, U.S. Attorney James Santelle, ATF agent Jeff Magee and Oak Creek Police Chief John Edwards will be at a briefing Wednesday morning at FBI offices in downtown Milwaukee.

Hundreds of people gathered Tuesday night in Oak Creek to remember the six worshippers who were killed when a gunman opened fire at their temple Sunday. The victims were remembered as peaceful individuals dedicated to their families and faith.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, August 8, 2012 --- 6:50 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- There's no trial to prepare, no jury to persuade, no judge to hand down a sentence.

Wade Michael Page is dead, killed by police after fatally shooting six people at a Sikh temple outside Milwaukee. Although detectives are pursuing leads in several states, their findings might never be presented in court.

But investigators still want to know the full story behind the attack, especially a motive that might provide answers to devastated Sikh families and valuable information about white supremacists.

At the moment, detectives are sifting through the gunman's life, assembling the biography of an Army veteran who apparently had few relatives, a spotty work history and a thin criminal record. They have warned they may never learn for certain why he attacked.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED: Tuesday, August 7, 2012 --- 8:02p.m.

SOUTH MILWAUKEE, Wis. (AP) -- Police in South Milwaukee say they've arrested the ex-girlfriend of a man who shot and killed six worshippers at a Sikh temple Sunday before police shot and killed him.

Police Chief Ann Wellins released a statement Tuesday saying Misty M. Cook has been arrested on a tentative charge of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

There was no immediate indication that her arrest was linked to Sunday's shooting. Police refused to provide additional details.

Messages left with Wellins and prosecutors were not immediately returned. The voicemail on Cook's cellphone was full and wouldn't accept a message.

Cook was the ex-girlfriend of Wade Michael Page, who was involved with white supremacy groups.

Details of Cook's felony conviction weren't immediately clear. Online court records didn't list any felony prosecutions.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, August 7, 2012 --- 3:05 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The white supremacist who went on a shooting rampage at a Sikh temple bought the gun at a suburban Milwaukee shop days before the incident.

Kevin Nugent owns The Shooters Shop in West Allis. He says Wade Michael Page bought a Springfield Armory XDM 9 mm semiautomatic pistol from the shop on July 28. Page picked it up July 30 after he cleared the usual background checks.

Page walked into the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek on Sunday and opened fire, killing six people and wounding three more. Police killed Page in a parking lot shoot-out.

Nugent says he has viewed surveillance video of Page making the purchase and he appeared normal.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel was the first to report the purchase http://bit.ly/QBYGiD .

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED: Tuesday, August 7, 2012 --- 9:25 a.m.

BALTIMORE (AP) -- A Baltimore label that distributed music by the gunman in the Wisconsin Sikh temple shooting says it has removed all of the band's music from its website.

Label 56 also issued a statement saying it does not seek attention through "shock value" and has worked to encourage people to take a positive path. The label also asks people not take what the gunman did as honorable or respectable, or think that "we are all like that."

Authorities say Wade Michael Page, who was killed at the scene of the temple shooting, played in white supremacist heavy metal bands. Page also described himself as a member of the skinhead group "Hammerskins Nation," according to the SITE Monitoring Service, a Maryland-based firm that searches the Internet for extremist activity.

Copyright 2012: Associated Press

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, August 7, 2012 --- 7:20 a.m.

GRANGER, Iowa (AP) -- Wade Michael Page, who authorities say killed six people at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, apparently worked as a driver for an Iowa trucking company but was fired nearly two years ago.

Barr-Nunn Transportation, which is based in the central Iowa town of Granger, says "a Wade Michael Page" was employed from mid-April 2006 through Aug. 10, 2010, while he lived in North Carolina.

The company says Page was fired for violating the company policy on impaired driving, which also applies to personal vehicles on personal time.

The company says Page was dismissed after he was ticketed on Aug. 8, 2010, for driving "while subject to an impairing substance." He was driving a personal vehicle on his own time when he was pulled over.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

___________________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, August 7, 2012 --- 7:15 a.m.

From NBCNews.com:

The gunman who allegedly attacked a Sikh temple in southern Wisconsin, killing six people and wounding four, was a “white supremacist skinhead” and “frustrated neo-Nazi” who led a white power punk and metal band, groups that track extremism said Monday.

Wade Michael Page, 40, was the founder of End Apathy, according to Mark Potok, a senior fellow at the Southern Poverty Law Center. In a blog post about Page, Potok cited an April 2010 interview that the alleged gunman gave to the “Uprise Direct” music website about the band’s work.

Page said his band, which formed in 2005, “was based on trying to figure out what it would take to actually accomplish positive results in society and what is holding us back. A lot of what I realized at the time was that if we could figure out how to end people’s apathetic ways it would be the start towards moving forward. Of course after that it requires discipline, strict discipline to stay the course in our sick society.

“So, in a sense it was view of psychology and sociology. But I didn't want to just point the finger at what other people should do, but also I was willing to point out some of my faults on how I was holding myself back. And that is how I wrote the song ‘Self Destruct,’’ he said.

Mark Pitcavage, director of investigative research for the Anti-Defamation League, said Page was a mem­ber of the Ham­mer­skins, "one of the oldest and largest hardcore racist skinhead groups," and iden­ti­fied him­self as a North­ern Ham­mer­skin, part of the group’s upper Mid­west branch.

End Apa­thy had been a fea­tured band in recent years at many Hammerskin-organized white power music con­certs, such as the August 2010 “Meet & Greet BBQ & Bands” in North Car­olina, the Ham­mer­skins’ St. Patty’s Day Show in March 2011 in Orlando, Fla., and Ham­mer­fest 2011 last Octo­ber in Orlando, Pitcavage noted in a blog post, in which he described Page as a "white supremacist skinhead."

“We had identified Page several years ago as someone who was prominent in the white-power music scene,” he told NBC News. He said Page also used a pseudonym, “Jack Boot,” an apparent reference to the high military boots worn by members of dictatorial regimes such as Nazi Germany.

The white-power music scene is one of the main things that the Hammerskins do in the United States and is a “fairly important part of the white supremacist subculture" in the country, said Pitcavage. Because of Page's role in that music scene, he had already become linked with the Hammerskins through his involvement in bands tied to the group and his performances at their events.

Page became a “fully patched” member of the Hammerskins by late 2011 after going through an apprenticeship period. He had one of their tattoos on his right arm -- a sort of cogwheel with the numbers 838 inside it (838 is an alpha-numeric code that means “hail crossed hammers,” a reference to their logo of two-crossed hammers that was taken from Pink Floyd’s “The Wall”), Pitcavage said. The tattoo also had the group’s colors of red, black and yellow.

A photo of Page also showed that he had a Celtic Cross tattoo with the number 14 in it, which is a “major white supremacist symbol,” Pitcavage said.

The Hammerskins emerged in Texas in the mid-to-late 1980s and spread across the country. They are loosely organized, not hierarchical and tend to group themselves regionally.

“It has had a strong association with violence over the past several decades,” Pitcavage said, noting that it was not surprising that the alleged gunman “was a white supremacist because white supremacist shooting sprees tend to be directed at minorities.”

Page said in the “Uprise” interview that his music was a mix of '80s punk, metal and Oi!, a subgenre of punk.

“The topics vary from sociological issues, religion, and how the value of human life has been degraded by being submissive to tyranny and hypocrisy that we are subjugated to,” he said in the interview.

Page was a “frustrated neo-Nazi who had been the leader of a racist white-power band,” wrote Potok, of the Southern Poverty Law Center. “In 2000, the Southern Poverty Law Center has found that Page also attempted to purchase goods from the neo-Nazi National Alliance, then America's most important hate group.”

The FBI was “looking at ties to white supremacist groups” in the case, said Teresa Carlson, FBI special agent in charge in Milwaukee. They were also investigating the attack as possible domestic terrorism, which she noted meant use of force or violence for social or political gain. The FBI did not have an active investigation on Page before Sunday.

Page, an Army veteran who served from 1992 to 1998 but was never deployed, said in the “Uprise” interview that he was from Colorado and that in 2000 he “wanted to basically start over.”

“So, I sold everything I owned except for my motorcycle and what I could fit into a backpack and went on cross country trip visiting friends and attending festivals and shows. I went to the Hammerfest 2000 in Georgia, over to North Carolina, up to Ohio, down to West Virginia, and out to California… .”

Since 2009, the United States has been in the middle of a “huge resurgence” of right-wing extremism largely split into two spheres: an anti-government extremist one, such as the militia movement, and white supremacists, Pitcavage said. The number of militia groups has quintupled in the past three years and there have been many arrests of white supremacists over the same time for acts of violence, he said.

The election of a non-white president and the struggling economy were the triggers, Pitcavage said.

“It’s just a huge number of incidents from the extreme right since 2009. It’s the biggest resurgence of right-wing extremist activity since the mid-1990s and the Oklahoma City bombing (in 1995), and it’s causing problems all around the country,” he added.

On End Apathy's Myspace page, the group listed its location as Nashville, N.C., and said they had finished recording for an upcoming release on Label 56, which the ADL described as a Maryland-based company that distributes racist skinhead music, videos and merchandise. The last login for the page was dated Feb. 21, 2012.

Label 56 issued a statement Monday saying that all images and products related to the group had been removed from their website.

“We do not wish to profit from this tragedy financially or with publicity,” said the label. “In closing please do not take what Wade did as honorable or respectable and please do not think we are all like that.”

Label 56 officials did not respond to an email and phone call seeking comment.


NBC15 615 Forward Drive Madison, Wisconsin 53711 Business: 608-274-1515 Newsroom: 608-274-1500
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 165063386 - nbc15.com/a?a=165063386