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UPDATE: Mother of slain girls remarried, pregnant


Aaron Schaffhausen

Aaron Schaffhausen

UPDATED Thursday, January 30, 2014 --- 8:45 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- A mother whose three daughters were murdered by their father in northwestern Wisconsin is working to honor their memory, is remarried and is expecting a child.

Jessica Peterson says she misses her girls a lot and will always carry the pain of their loss. But, Peterson says she's trying to live her life in a way that would make the girls proud.

Peterson and the River Falls community have raised nearly $250,000 so far for the Tri-Angles Playground in memory of 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia. The cost of the playground is $550,000. The girls' father, Aaron Schaffhausen, is serving life behind bars for their deaths in 2012.

Peterson, who is seven months pregnant, tells KSTP-TV she will always be a little sad and a little happy at the same time.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Friday, January 24, 2014 --- 6:33 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A judge has ordered a man convicted of killing his three daughters to pay more than $25,000 in restitution and court costs.

St. Croix County Circuit Judge Howard Cameron ruled Friday that Aaron Schaffhausen must pay over $14,000 in restitution to Jessica Peterson. The St. Paul Pioneer Press reports (http://bit.ly/1aQ5eVp ) the money would compensate her for an emergency room visit the day of the killings, counseling and lost wages.

The judge also ordered him to pay over $10,000 for witness costs.

Schaffhausen is serving a life sentence for killing his three girls at their home in River Falls in western Wisconsin in July 2012.

Schaffhausen is not currently working in prison, and prosecutor Gary Freyberg says it remains to be seen if Schaffhausen will ever pay the money in full.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, September 24, 2013 --- 5:00 p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- A western Wisconsin house where a father murdered his three young daughters last year is no more.

Crews have finished dismantling the River Falls home. KARE-TV reports some cleanup remains, but the lot that stood under the house soon will be put up for sale.

Prosecutors say Aaron Schaffhausen killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia to get back at his ex-wife. Schaffhausen was sentenced in July to life in prison with no chance of parole.

Affinity Plus Federal Credit Union held the note on the home. The credit union decided to dismantle the house and salvage materials that could be donated to Habitat for Humanity.

Proceeds from the lot sale will be donated to a proposed River Falls playground in memory of the slain girls.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, September 16, 2013 --- 6:36 p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- Crews have begun dismantling the western Wisconsin house where a father killed his three young daughters last year.

Work began Monday at the house in River Falls. It will be taken apart piece by piece over 10 days and the materials donated to the St. Croix Valley Habitat for Humanity.

Affinity Plus Credit Union will sell the land and proceeds will help build a River Falls playground in memory of 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie, and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen.

KARE-TV reports so far, $110,000 has been raised for the playground along with more than $120,000 in materials and labor that also have been promised.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, September 16, 2013 --- 8:43 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- Crews will begin dismantling the western Wisconsin house where a father killed his three young daughters last year.

Work begins Monday at the house in River Falls. It will be taken apart piece by piece over 10 days and the materials donated to the St. Croix Valley Habitat for Humanity.

Affinity Plus Credit Union will sell the land and proceeds will help build a River Falls playground in memory of 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie, and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, September 10, 2013 --- 7:54 p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- The western Wisconsin house where a father killed his three daughters last year will be dismantled.

Instead of being demolished, the River Falls house will be taken apart piece by piece, starting Monday. Salvageable items will be donated to Habitat For Humanity.

The Leader-Telegram reports the property eventually will be bulldozed and sold. Proceeds will be donated to a playground in honor of the slain girls.

Affinity Plus Federal Credit Union of St. Paul, Minn., held the note on the home. Dave Larson of Affinity Plus tells KARE-TV the decision was made after discussions with Jessica Schaffhausen, the girls' mother.

Prosecutors say Aaron Schaffhausen killed the girls in an act of revenge against his ex-wife. He claimed he was insane but was sentenced to life in prison without parole.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, August 13, 2013 --- 1:05 p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- The River Falls house where three young girls were killed by their father will go back to the bank after no one placed a bid on the foreclosed property.

An auction for the Schaffhausen property was held Tuesday at the St. Croix County Government Center. KSTP-TV reports about five people attended the auction, but no one placed a bid on the house.

The home is where 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen were killed by Aaron Schaffhausen last year. He's serving life in prison.

He tried to sell the house after killing the girls, but their mother, Jessica Schaffhausen objected because he would have profited from the sale.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, August 13, 2013 --- 8:43 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- An auction will be held for the River Falls house where three young sisters were killed by their father.

The foreclosure sale for the Schaffhausen property will be held at the St. Croix County Government Center at 10 a.m. Tuesday.

The home is where 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen were killed by Aaron Schaffhausen last year. He's serving life in prison.

He tried to sell the house after killing the girls, but their mother, Jessica Schaffhausen objected because he would have profited from the sale.

Anyone who buys the house at the auction must have 10 percent of the winning bid on hand. KSTP-TV says if no one buys the property it goes back to the bank.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, August 6, 2013 --- 10:04 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The mother of three young girls who died at their father's hand is selling their artwork to raise money for a playground honoring them.

Aaron Schaffhausen killed his daughters, 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie, and 5-year-old Cecilia, last year in the River Falls home the girls shared with their mother, Jessica Schaffhausen.

Aaron Schaffhausen and Jessica Schaffhausen are divorced. Prosecutors say Aaron Schaffhausen killed the girls to hurt Jessica. He was sentenced in July to life in prison.

The Eau Claire Leader-Telegram reports more than 100 pieces of the girls' artwork will be on display at River Falls art gallery on Friday. The pieces will be sold through a silent auction that will begin that day and run through Aug. 21.

The playground is expected to cost $550,000.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Saturday, July 20, 2013 --- 7:36 p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- A run and walk in the western Wisconsin community of River Falls has raised nearly $50,000 for a proposed playground dedicated to the memory of three girls who were slain by their father.

The Tri Angels 5K at Hoffman Park on Saturday honored the three Schaffhausen sisters-- 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie, and 5-year-old Cecilia. Organizers say it drew 1,250 participants.

Jessica Schaffhausen says summers spent at Hoffman Park are among her favorite memories of her daughters. She says they would walk from their home past the park to the library and home again.

Prosecutors say the girls' father, Aaron Schaffhausen, killed them last year in an act of revenge against his ex-wife. He tried to claim insanity. He was sentenced Monday to life in prison with no chance of parole.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED Tuesday, July 16, 2013 --- 7:55 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- The mother of three young girls killed by their father says she's relieved he has been sentenced to spend the rest of his life in prison.

Jessica Schaffhausen tells KSTP-TV she feels safer and more confident now that her ex-husband, Aaron Schaffhausen, has been sentenced to prison with no chance of parole.

Aaron Schaffhausen admitted killing 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia at their River Falls home in July 2012 to hurt his ex-wife, but argued he had a mental defect that kept him from knowing it was wrong. A jury found he was sane.

Jessica Schaffhausen says that now she can forget about her ex-husband and focus on living her life to honor her daughters.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, July 15, 2013 --- 3:54 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A Wisconsin man who killed his three daughters to get back at his ex-wife has been sentenced to life in prison with no parole.

Aaron Schaffhausen was convicted in April of killing his daughters, ages 11, 8 and 5, at their home in River Falls.

The 35-year-old Schaffhausen had admitted killing the girls in July 2012 to get back at his ex-wife, but argued he had a mental defect that kept him from knowing it was wrong.

Life sentences were mandatory in each girl's death, but Schaffhausen had the prospect of supervised release after at least 20 years in prison. That was rejected by St. Croix County Circuit Judge Howard Cameron.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, July 15, 2013 --- 7:50 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A Wisconsin man who killed his three daughters to get back at his ex-wife will soon learn if he'll spend the rest of his life in prison.

A jury found in April that 35-year-old Aaron Schaffhausen was sane when he killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia at their River Falls' home. He'll be sentenced Monday in St. Croix County.

He faces a mandatory sentence of life in prison for each death. The judge must decide if that sentence will include the possibility of supervised release after at least 20 years, or if Schaffhausen will stay behind bars forever.

Schaffhausen admitted he killed the girls last July to get back at his ex-wife. Jurors found he had a mental defect, but knew the killings were wrong.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, July 4, 2013 --- 9:28 am

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- Motorcyclists in western Wisconsin are planning a 100-mile ride to raise money for a playground to honor three sisters who were killed by their father.

A jury found 35-year-old Aaron Schaffhausen was sane when he killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia last July in the girls' River Falls home.

The St. Paul Pioneer Press reports the "River Falls Cruisin for a Cause" motorcycle run will start in River Falls on July 20 and stop at several venues in western Wisconsin. The ride ends with a poker game at Johnnie's Bar in River Falls.

The event costs $10 for a bike and rider, $5 per passenger and $5 for each poker hand. Proceeds will go to the Schaffhausen Memorial Fund, toward a new playground to honor the girls.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 24, 2013 --- 11:01pm

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A Wisconsin judge has set sentencing for July 15 for a man who admitted killing his three daughters in the girls' River Falls home.

Last week a jury found 35-year-old Aaron Schaffhausen was sane when he killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia last July.

Although jurors agreed Schaffhausen suffered from a mental defect at the time, they found it did not prevent him from knowing what he did was wrong.

The Star Tribune (http://bit.ly/17U1Of5 ) reports Schaffhausen will be sentenced to prison instead of a mental institution.

Schaffhausen faces a mandatory sentence of life in prison for each daughter's death. The judge could decide to make him eligible for extended supervision after he serves at least 20 years, but could also decide he will get no chance at release.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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Posted Monday, April 22, 2013 --- 10:07am

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- The mother of three young girls killed by their father in River Falls says she tries to focus on the joy her daughters brought to the world.

Jessica Schaffhausen says she tries not to think about how her girls died, but rather how they lived and the personalities that made them unique. She talked to the Star Tribune (http://bit.ly/ZH6113 ) about her daughters.

Eleven-year-old Amara was a budding scientist who watched MIT lectures online and brought home report cards filled with `As.' Eight-year-old Sophie often had an artist brush in her hand, always messy with paint or chalk. Five-year-old Cecilia loved listening and critiquing music and tried to keep up with her old sisters.

Jessica Schaffhausen says she is grateful for the kindness and support of friends, family and even strangers.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 --6:32 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- Jurors in western Wisconsin say a father had a mental defect but is still responsible for killing his three young daughters last July.

Aaron Schaffhausen pleaded guilty last month to three counts of first-degree intentional homicide in the deaths of 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia. But he argued he was not responsible because of a mental illness.

Jurors deliberated for about 3 1/2 hours before reaching their verdict.

During closing arguments Tuesday, prosecutor Gary Freyberg said Schaffhausen was in control of his actions and was a mean, callous person -- but not legally insane.

Defense attorney John Kucinski argued Schaffhausen has a rare mental disorder, rooted in a deep dependency on his ex-wife.

The jury found he had the capacity to know what he did was wrong.

Copyright Associated Press 2013

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 16, 2013 --- 1:18 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- Prosecutors say a Wisconsin man who has admitted he killed his three young daughters was in control of his actions and decided that a "selfish desire for revenge" was worth more than his girls' lives.

Jurors are weighing whether Aaron Schaffhausen was legally sane when he killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia in their River Falls home last July.

During closing arguments Tuesday, prosecutor Gary Freyberg told jurors that Schaffhausen was in control of his actions, and that he is a mean, callous person -- but not legally insane.

Defense attorney John Kucinski said earlier that Schaffhausen has a rare mental disorder, rooted in a deep dependency on his wife.

Schaffhausen has pleaded guilty to three counts of first-degree intentional homicide, but he maintains he's not responsible.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 16, 2013 --- 11:43 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A defense attorney for a western Wisconsin man who has admitted to killing his three young daughters says his client has a mental disease and should go to a psychiatric institution -- not prison.

Jurors are weighing whether Aaron Schaffhausen was legally sane when he killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia in their River Falls home last July.

During closing arguments Tuesday, defense attorney John Kucinski said the slayings were "psychogenetic killings" that arose from Schaffhausen's mental disease, triggered by a loss of his wife and children through divorce. He says Schaffhausen suffers from a rare disorder, rooted in a deep dependency on his wife.

Prosecutors have said Schaffhausen cut his girls' throats in a jealous rage. The government is now presenting its closing arguments.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, April 15, 2013 --- 11:56 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A psychiatrist who evaluated a man accused of killing his three daughters testified the father was mentally aware of his criminal actions.

Dr. Erik Knudson testified Monday as the sanity trial for Aaron Schaffhausen entered its third week in St. Croix County Circuit Court. Knudson, testifying for the prosecution, said that after Schaffhausen killed the girls, he drove around aimlessly, discarding items from his car that could possibly connect him to the crime. KSTP-TV reports the psychiatrist says Schaffhausen's action shows he was "capable of conforming his conduct."

Aaron Schaffhausen has pleaded guilty to three counts of first-degree intentional homicide, but he maintains he's not responsible for killing 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie, and 5-year-old Cecilia because of a mental illness. Jurors will determine his sanity.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED: Thursday, April 11, 2013 --- 11:17pm

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- Police who discovered the bodies of three Wisconsin sisters have testified at the insanity trial of the girls' father.

The officers arrived at the River Falls home of Aaron Schaffhausen's ex-wife on July 10, 2012.

Police officer Christopher Kober told jurors Thursday that he saw a pool of blood on the floor.

The officers found the girls -- 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia -- dead in their beds.

WCCO-TV (http://cbsloc.al/YgbCfc) reports a compliance officer at a Twin Cities credit union testified Schaffhausen withdrew $1,000 from his account the day before the killings.

Schaffhausen had $800 cash on him when he turned himself in. The prosecution contends he may have considered fleeing after the killings.

Schaffhausen has admitted killing his daughters, but the defense contends he was legally insane.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press
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UPDATED Wednesday, April 10, 2013 --- 10:57 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A father who admitted killing his three daughters in western Wisconsin won't testify at his insanity trial.

The defense has rested in St. Croix County Circuit Court where jurors will decide whether Aaron Schaffhausen is legally responsible for the girls' deaths or whether his mental state means he's not guilty because of his disease and should be institutionalized.

The prosecution and defense have both provided psychiatric testimony on Schaffhausen's mental state.

Psychologist J. Reid Meloy testified Tuesday for the defense. He told the court Schaffhausen meets the requirements of legal insanity.

On Monday, Dr. Ralph Baker, a court-appointed psychiatrist, testified that he found Schaffhausen was legally sane when he killed the girls, ages 5, 8 and 11, in their River Falls home on July 10.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 9, 2013 --- 6:05 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A defense mental health expert says a man who admitted killing his three young daughters in western Wisconsin is not legally responsible for their deaths.

Psychologist J. Reid Meloy testified Tuesday at Aaron Schaffhausen's insanity trial in St. Croix County.

The St. Paul Pioneer Press reports Meloy interviewed Schaffhausen for more than 10 hours over two sessions. He told the court that the 35-year-old met the requirements of legal insanity.

His testimony follows testimony Monday by Dr. Ralph Baker, a court-appointed psychiatrist, who found Schaffhausen was legally sane when he killed the girls in their River Falls home on July 10.

Schaffhausen has pleaded guilty to killing 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia, but maintains a plea of not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, April 8, 2013 --- 5:48 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A co-worker of Aaron Schaffhausen is charged with threatening a witness at a trial to determine whether Schaffhausen was sane when he killed his three young daughters in Wisconsin.

Thirty-one-year-old Joe Rollag was charged Monday. Rollag also is charged with possessing a switchblade knife, carrying a concealed weapon and disorderly conduct.

According to the complaint, Rollag approached a deputy monitoring the metal detector at the St. Croix (kroy) County Government Center Friday and said he needed to talk to Schaffhausen's attorney. The deputy removed two knives from Rollag in a conference room. The complaint says a butterfly knife later was found on the floor of Rollag's pickup in the government center parking lot.

Sheriff John Shilts says security was stepped up Monday as Schaffhausen's insanity trial entered its second week.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, April 8, 2013 --- 3:53 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A psychiatrist has testified that a man who admitted killing his three young daughters in western Wisconsin is not insane.

Dr. Ralph Baker testified for the prosecution Monday as the second week of Aaron Schaffhausen's insanity trial got underway.

Baker spent nearly four hours interviewing Schaffhausen. Baker told jurors he believes that Schaffhausen has major depression disorder but was not insane the day he killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia at their house in River Falls last July.

KARE-TV reports Baker says Schaffhausen told him what happened at the house was a "spur of the moment thing."

Schaffhausen told Baker he tried to help Cecilia find her shoes, and the next thing he knew, he had his hands on her neck and was strangling her.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, April 8, 2013 --- 12:31 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- The parents of a man who has admitted killing his three young daughters testified about their son's troubled childhood and mental health issues as the second week of his sanity trial got underway in western Wisconsin.

Roger Schaffhausen testified his son, Aaron Schaffhausen, was a rebellious and belligerent teen who had some "run-ins with the law." The elder Schaffhausen says his son stole a gun, brought it to high school and was expelled.

KARE-TV reports Sue Schaffhausen testified Monday that her son became extremely depressed when he and his wife, Jessica, broke up. She also testified that mental illness was an issue for other members of her family.

Schaffhausen has pleaded guilty to killing 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia at their house in River Falls last July.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Posted: Friday, April 5, 2013 --- 11:22pm

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- St. Croix County authorities say security will be tighter Monday at the western Wisconsin courthouse where a man is on trial in the killings of his three daughters.

The sheriff's office issued a statement saying deputies responded to a "potential threat" inside the St. Croix County Government Center and Courthouse in Hudson around 9:45 a.m. Friday. The statement says one individual was taken into custody and there's "no other known threat to the public."

Sgt. Jeff Kennett says authorities aren't providing further details on the incident. He says he can't comment on whether it's related to the trial of Aaron Schaffhausen, who's on trial for killing his three daughters at their River Falls home last summer.

The statement says access to the Government Center will require security screening starting Monday.
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HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- Former coworkers of Aaron Schaffhausen have testified they heard him say several times that he wanted to kill his ex-wife, their children and the man she was dating in the months before he killed his three young daughters.

The St. Croix County Circuit Court jury considering his case heard from the former coworkers from Minot, N.D., on Friday.

Schaffhausen pleaded guilty last week to three counts of first-degree intentional homicide for killing his three daughters in their River Falls home last July.

He contends he was not responsible for the killings because of mental illness. But prosecutors maintain he was sane, and that he killed the girls to take revenge on his ex-wife because he was angry with her for divorcing him and for seeing another man.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

UPDATED Thursday, April 4, 2013 --- 11:53 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- The mother of three girls who were killed by their father in northwestern Wisconsin says she was worried about leaving the children alone in his care.

Jessica Schaffhausen testified for a second day in St. Croix County Circuit Court where jurors will decide whether her ex-husband, Aaron Schaffhausen, was sane when he killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia.

Schaffhausen testified that if left alone in the care of her husband, she worried he would forget to feed them or put them to bed on time.

KSTP-TV reports Schaffhausen said her husband stopped talking to their children in October of 2011 after moving to North Dakota for work, but told the jury that he would call her up to 30 times a day to harass her.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, April 3, 2013 --- 6:00 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- The mother of three girls who were slain by their father says her ex-husband was taking medication for depression and seemed to be getting better in 2011.

Aaron Schaffhausen has pleaded guilty in the murders of 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia. But he claims he was not responsible due to mental illness. The trial in St. Croix County will determine his sanity.

While testifying Wednesday, Jessica Schaffhausen cried when shown a photograph of the girls. According to KSTP-TV, she testified that after their divorce, Aaron Schaffhausen sometimes called her 30 times in a row.

Earlier Wednesday, jurors watched an interview of Aaron Schaffhausen recorded the day of the murders. In the video, he can be seen crying. At one point he says: "I want my girls back."

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 2, 2013 --- 12:30 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A prosecutor says a Wisconsin man on trial for killing his three young daughters in July was driven by revenge against his ex-wife.

Gary Freyberg, Wisconsin's assistant attorney general, told jurors Tuesday that Aaron Schaffhausen decided killing the girls was the best way to punish his ex-wife.

The 35-year-old Schaffhausen has admitted killing his daughters -- ages 11, 8 and 5 -- at their home in River Falls, Wis., last July. Schaffhausen is seeking to convince a jury he's not responsible due to mental illness.

Freyberg used his opening statement to reject the idea that Schaffhausen couldn't control his emotions or actions.

Freyberg says Schaffhausen planned the killings, brought the tool he used to cut his daughters' throats with him from North Dakota and tried to get rid of evidence.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 2, 2013 --- 10:44 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- The attorney for a man accused of killing his three young daughters in Wisconsin says his client was spiraling out of control in the months leading up to the slayings last July.

Aaron Schaffhausen, 35, has admitted killing his daughters -- ages 11, 8 and 5 -- at their home in River Falls, Wis. But Schaffhausen is seeking to convince a jury that he's not responsible due to mental illness.

In opening statements Monday at his trial in Hudson, defense attorney John Kucinski says Schaffhausen became increasingly erratic and obsessive after he and his ex-wife, Jessica, divorced in January. He says Schaffhausen called Jessica constantly and sometimes threatened to hurt her or the girls.

Prosecutors say Schaffhausen planned the killings and that contradicts his claim of mental illness.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, April 2, 2013 --- 10:27 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- Opening statements are expected to begin in the insanity trial of a man who admitted last week that he killed his three daughters in their River Falls home.

Thirty-five-year-old Aaron Schaffhausen pleaded guilty to three counts of first-degree intentional homicide, but he maintains he is not responsible because of a mental illness. Opening statements are scheduled to begin Tuesday morning in St. Croix County.

Prosecutors say Schaffhausen knew what he was doing last July when he killed 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia. They say he did it because he was angry at his ex-wife.

If Schaffhausen is found sane, he could go to prison for life. If the jury finds he was not responsible, he could be committed to a psychiatric institution and possibly released someday.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Sunday, March 31, 2013 --- 3:03 pm

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A Wisconsin man has admitted slashing his three daughters to death. Now, a jury will decide whether they believe his claim that he was insane when he did it.

Aaron Schaffhausen goes on trial Monday in St. Croix County, just east of Minneapolis. Schaffhausen last week admitted cutting the throats of his daughters -- 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia -- last July in their River Falls home.

Prosecutors say Schaffhausen was bitter over his divorce from his ex-wife, Jessica, and angry because he thought she had begun seeing another man. A criminal complaint says he called his ex-wife the day the girls were slain and told her: "You can come home now because I killed the kids."

Schaffhausen's attorney says his client has a "major depressive order."

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, March 28, 2013 --- 2:56 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A man has pleaded guilty to killing his three young daughters at their home in western Wisconsin, but still maintains he shouldn't be held responsible because he was insane.

Thirty-five-year-old Aaron Schaffhausen changed his plea Thursday after more than a day of legal wrangling about what kind of evidence would be allowed at his trial. He answered yes when the judge asked if he was guilty.

Jury selection is due to begin Monday in St. Croix County Circuit Court.

The change-in-plea means prosecutors won't have to prove Schaffhausen killed his daughters at their River Falls home last July. The defense will have to prove he had a mental disease or defect, and that he lacked substantial capacity to appreciate that what he did was wrong or couldn't control his impulses.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, February 20, 2013 --- 11:44 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A potential plea change for a North Dakota man accused of killing his three daughters in Wisconsin is on hold.

Defense attorney John Kucinski had said Aaron Schaffhausen might change his plea at Wednesday's pretrial hearing. Schaffhausen has pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect.

Kucinski said Schaffhausen might admit the killings but maintain an insanity claim. But after prosecutors and defense attorneys met for several hours, St. Croix County Circuit Judge Howard Cameron said the two sides would file briefs on the matter and he set another hearing for Thursday.

The Minot, N.D., construction worker faces three counts of first-degree intentional homicide in the July 10 deaths of his daughters, 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia. His trial starts Monday.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, February 20, 2013 --- 12:56 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A judge has ordered a man accused of killing his three young daughters to undergo two separate psychiatric examinations before his trial.

Aaron Schaffhausen is charged with killing his daughters -- 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia -- during a visit to their River Falls home last summer. They were found in their beds with their throats slit.

WCCO-TV reports the judge on Wednesday ordered Schaffhausen's attorney to let the state have two separate experts examine him.

The Minot, N.D., construction worker has pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect.

Last month, Schaffhausen's attorney was ordered to give prosecutors copies of the defense's mental health reports.

Another motions hearing is set for March 1. Schaffhausen's trial is set to start April 1.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, January 16, 2013 --- 1:52 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A judge won't move the trial for a North Dakota construction worker accused of killing his daughters out of St. Croix County.

Aaron Schaffhausen's public defender, John Kucinski, had asked Judge Howard Cameron for a change of venue. Cameron denied the request on Thursday. The judge said he believed a fair and impartial jury could be drawn from within the county.

Schaffhausen faces three counts of first-degree intentional homicide and one count of attempted arson in connection with the deaths of his daughters, 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia. Police in July discovered all three girls tucked into their beds in their River Falls home with their throats slit.

Schaffhausen has pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect. His trial is set for April.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, January 16, 2013 --- 4:20 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A North Dakota construction worker has pleaded not guilty by reason of mental disease and defect to killing his three young daughters in River Falls.

Aaron Schaffhausen faces three counts of first-degree intentional homicide and one count of attempted arson in connection with the July deaths of his daughters, 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia.

Police discovered all three girls tucked into their beds with their throats slit in July. Prosecutors say Schaffhausen killed the girls to hurt his ex-wife.

Schaffhausen pleaded not guilty to all the charges in August. A St. Croix County judge entered not guilty pleas on all four charges for Schaffhausen in August. Schaffhausen's attorney, John Kucinski, filed the mental disease pleas on Wednesday.

Schaffhausen's trail is set for April.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, December 3, 2012 --- 8:15 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- Defense attorneys want to suppress statements made by the father accused of killing his three young daughters at their western Wisconsin home.

Aaron Schaffhausen was back in St. Croix County Circuit Court Monday. The defense is trying to suppress Schaffhausen's statements in the case, based on Miranda warning questions and the voluntary nature of anything said or indicated after he turned himself in.

The 35-year-old carpenter from Minot, N.D., is accused of killing 5-year-old Cecilia, 8-year-old Sophie and 11-year-old Amara Schaffhausen at their home in River Falls last July during a visit with his daughters.

The Star Tribune (http://bit.ly/11GGhFi) reports Schaffhausen, clad in orange jail garb, sat quietly through the hearing, whispering a couple times with a defense investigator while his attorney questioned witnesses.

Copyright 2012: Associated Press

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UPDATED: Monday, December 3, 2012 --- 12:00 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- The father accused of killing his three young daughters at the girls' western Wisconsin home is back in court.

Among the issues expected to be addressed at a hearing for Aaron Schaffhausen in St. Croix County Circuit Court Monday is a videotaped police interrogation and what jurors may or may not be able to see from the 3 1/2-hour interview.

The 35-year-old carpenter from Minot, N.D., is accused of killing 5-year-old Cecilia, 8-year-old Sophie and 11-year-old Amara Schaffhausen at their home in River Falls last July during a visit with his daughters.

The Star Tribune (http://bit.ly/SsdOPz ) reports the home owned by Schaffhausen where the girls died is now in foreclosure.

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Information from: Star Tribune, http://www.startribune.com

Copyright 2012: Associated Press
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UPDATED: Wednesday, November 21, 2012 -- 2:20 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A man charged with murdering his daughters in River Falls last July has a few weeks to consider whether he will plead insanity.

At a pretrial hearing Wednesday, a judge told Aaron Schaffhausen's attorney he has until Dec. 14 to file a motion to plead not guilty by reason of insanity. The Star Tribune reports St. Croix County Circuit Court Judge Howard Cameron also gave the defense until Dec. 28 to request a change of venue.

Schaffhausen faces three counts of first-degree intentional homicide for the deaths of 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia. All three girls were found tucked into their beds with their throats slit.

Schaffhausen faces mandatory life in prison if convicted. The judge could grant him a chance at parole, however.

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Information from: Star Tribune, http://www.startribune.com

Copyright 2012: Associated Press
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UPDATED: Thursday, September 20, 2012 --- 8:08p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- A judge has ruled attorneys for a man accused of killing his three young daughters in Wisconsin will get copies of sensitive evidence.

Judge Howard Cameron ruled Thursday at a motion hearing for North Dakota construction worker Aaron Schaffhausen in St. Croix (kroy) County. Prosecutors did not want to provide Schaffhausen's attorneys with copies of the materials -- including crime scene photos -- for fear the evidence would be made public.

Prosecutor Gary Freyberg says some of the evidence is "extremely graphic."

The St. Paul Pioneer Press (http://bit.ly/Ujh6Yf) reports the judge ruled the defense would get copies of the evidence, but the materials cannot be disseminated or given to Schaffhausen.

Schaffhausen is accused of killing 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophia and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen at their River Falls home in July.

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Information from: St. Paul Pioneer Press, http://www.twincities.com

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Wednesday, September 19, 2012 --- 11:46 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- The attorney for the man accused of killing his three young daughters is asking a court to stop a mental health professional from visiting the defendant in the St. Croix County Jail.

Attorney John Kucinski argues in appeal papers that the mental health worker is an "agent of the state" and that the repeated visits violate Aaron Schaffhausen's constitutional rights. Kucinski says the prosecutor and jail staff are working together to document information about Schaffhausen that can be used against him. He argues the documentation may hurt an insanity defense if they decide to pursue it.

The Star Tribune reports Kucinski has cited a sheriff's sergeant memo directing jailers to document Schaffhausen's behavior, visits and interactions. The Minot, N.D., carpenter is charged with killing 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophia and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED: Tuesday, August 28, 2012 --- 5:11p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A Wisconsin judge has entered not guilty pleas for a man accused of killing his three young daughters.

North Dakota construction worker Aaron Schaffhausen faces three homicide counts and an arson charge in the deaths of 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen.

Online court records show Aaron Schaffhausen's attorney stood mute during an arraignment in St. Croix County Circuit Court Tuesday. Judge Howard C. Cameron entered not guilty pleas for Schaffhausen on all the charges.

Police discovered the girls' bodies in the River Falls home they shared with their mother last month. They also found an overturned gasoline can in the basement.

Schaffhausen and the girls' mother divorced in January.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Tuesday, August 28, 2012 --- 7:40 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A North Dakota construction worker accused of killing his three young daughters is expected to enter a plea in a Wisconsin court.

Aaron Schaffhausen of Minot is scheduled to appear at an arraignment Tuesday in St. Croix County Circuit Court. Prosecutors expect him to enter a plea of not guilty by reason of mental disease or defect. His attorney has declined to comment on a possible plea.

Investigators believe Schaffhausen showed up at the house the girls shared with their mother in River Falls for a surprise visit last month while their mother was out. They believe he killed the girls and then called the mother and told her to come home because her children were dead.

Schaffhausen and the girls' mother divorced in January.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Wednesday, August 22, 2012 --- 7:55 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- The man accused of killing his three young daughters in River Falls is facing an additional charge.

Prosecutors have filed an attempted arson charge against Aaron Schaffhausen. The 35-year-old father is already facing three counts of first-degree intentional homicide. Eleven-year-old Amara, 9-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen were killed July 10 in the home they shared with their mother, Schaffhausen's ex-wife.

The St. Paul Pioneer Press (http://tinyurl.com/9vezjsz ) reports an investigator smelled gas in the basement of the River Falls home and found a gas container had been tipped over.

The Minot, N.D., construction worker is being held in the St. Croix County Jail on $2 million cash bond. An arraignment hearing is scheduled for Aug. 28.

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Information from: St. Paul Pioneer Press, http://www.twincities.com

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Wednesday, July 25, 2012 --- 10:05 a.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (AP) -- The attorney for a North Dakota man charged with killing his three young daughters in Wisconsin says the defense will provide evidence that shows the defendant was delusional and depressed before the girls were slain.

Defense lawyer John Kucinski says Aaron Schaffhausen had been depressed for quite a while and was taking medication. Kucinski tells the Eau Claire Leader-Telegram (http://bit.ly/MHXQh9 ) there were people who were concerned about his abnormal behavior, including his ex-wife who told relatives Schaffhausen had serious problems.

The Minot, N.D., construction worker, who turns 35 Wednesday, is being held in the St. Croix County Jail on $2 million cash bond. A judge on Tuesday ruled there's enough evidence to hold Schaffhausen for trial.

Eleven-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen were found slain in their River Falls home July 10.

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Information from: Leader-Telegram, http://www.leadertelegram.com/

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Tuesday, July 24, 2012 --- 11:52 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A St. Croix County judge has ordered a North Dakota construction worker accused of killing his three young daughters to stand trial.

Circuit Judge Scott Needham says prosecutors presented enough evidence during a preliminary hearing Tuesday to indicate Aaron Schaffhausen probably killed the girls.

Schaffhausen faces three counts of first-degree intentional homicide. Investigators say he showed up at the River Falls home his daughters share with his ex-wife Jessica Schaffhausen on July 10 while she was out. Police say they got a hysterical call from Jessica Schaffhausen who said her ex-husband told her had killed the kids and she could come home.

Schaffhausen is being held on a $2 million cash bond. His arraignment has been set for Aug. 28.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Tuesday, July 24, 2012 --- 10:58 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A River Falls Police receptionist says the mother of three slain children was hysterical when she called for help.

Aaron Schaffhausen faces three counts of first-degree intentional homicide in the deaths of his daughters. Investigators say he showed up at the home they shared with their mother, his ex-wife Jessica Schaffhausen, on July 10 while she was out and slit the girls' throats.

Ailene Splittgerber testified at Aaron Schaffhausen's preliminary hearing Tuesday in St. Croix County that she answered a call from Jessica Schaffhausen on July 10. She says the woman was in tears and told her that her ex-husband had called her and said he had killed the children.

Splittgerber says the call lasted about 40 minutes. She says Jessica Schaffhausen was crying and hysterical the entire time.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Friday, July 20, 2012 --- 7:40 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- A special prosecutor will lead the case against a father charged with killing his three young daughters in River Falls.

Assistant Attorney General Gary Freyberg will prosecute Aaron Schaffhausen. The St. Croix district attorney asked for help because of the complexity of the case.

WCCO-TV (http://cbsloc.al/NBLKbn ) reports the prosecution plans to file a motion requiring Schaffhausen to attend his preliminary hearing in person, not by video conference as his attorney indicated Schaffhausen would prefer.

Eleven-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen were killed at their home in River Falls last week.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Wednesday, July 18, 2012 --- 7:50 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- Family members from around the country and friends gathered at a golf club in River Falls to celebrate the lives of three young sisters.

Eleven-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen were killed at their home in River Falls last week. Their father has been charged in their deaths.

Their great uncle, Flint Watt, says family and friends laughed and cried as they shared stories about the girls and their antics. Amara liked soccer and gymnastics and was a budding scientist. Sophie excelled in art and the martial arts while Cecilia loved painting and searching for bugs.

Watt tells KSTP-TV (http://bit.ly/NhqaKP ) the family has not yet received the girls' remains and when they do, a private funeral service will be held.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED: Friday, July 13, 2012 --- 6:21p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- Police are asking for the public's help in finding a laptop computer believed to belong to a man charged with killing his three daughters in River Falls.

The laptop is a Sony VAIO in a Targus computer bag. A statement from the city says Aaron Schaffhausen may have disposed of them before he turned himself in Tuesday afternoon.

Officials say the items may be along a road or in a ditch. They say Schaffhausen may have driven east or north from the home where the girls were killed, and he could have driven as far as Baldwin. He was driving a metallic blue 2012 Chevrolet Cruze with California license plates.

Anyone who finds the items or saw the car is asked to call the River Falls Police Department at 715-425-0909.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Thursday, July 12, 2012 --- 2:22 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A North Dakota man has been charged in the killing of his three young daughters in Wisconsin.

St. Croix County District Attorney Eric Johnson filed three counts of first-degree intentional homicide Thursday against 34-year-old Aaron Schaffhausen of Minot.

Police discovered the bodies of 11-year-old Amara Schaffhausen, 8-year-old Sophie Schaffhausen and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen in the house the girls shared with their mother in River Falls on Tuesday. The Schaffhausens divorced last year.

Authorities have not said how the girls died.

Investigators say Aaron Schaffhausen unexpectedly visited the girls Tuesday while their mother was out, then called her to say he had harmed them. He later turned himself in to police.

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UPDATED Thursday, July 12, 2012 --- 1:49 p.m.

HUDSON, Wis. (WEAU) - The man accused of killing his three daughters is now facing murder charges in the case.

The three charges of First-Degree Intentional Homicide were filed against Aaron Schaffhausen, 34, of Minot, ND Thursday.

Authorities say he and his ex-wife, the girls' mother, had a rocky relationship.

Amara Schaffhausen, 11, Sophie Schaffhausen, 8, and Cecilia Schaffhausen, 5, were all found dead inside their River Falls home Tuesday afternoon.

Officers say Aaron Schaffhausen had called the girls' mother out of the blue and asked for an unplanned visit.

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UPDATED Thursday, July 12, 2012 --- 7:25 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- About 300 people gathered in a park for a memorial vigil to remember three young sisters found dead in their home in River Falls.

Girls in soccer uniforms wrote number 36 on their cheeks in honor of the teammate they lost -- 11-year-old Amara Schaffhausen. She and her sisters, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia, died Tuesday. Police are holding their father on possible homicide charges. Teammates cried and hugged each other and wrote messages to Amara on a soccer ball Wednesday night at Glen Park.

The Star Tribune (http://bit.ly/NN1N3V) says some family members and friends attended a private service at the family's church, Unitarian Universalist Society of River Falls.

Homicide charges could be filed against Aaron Schaffhausen Thursday. Authorities say he and his ex-wife, the girls' mother, had a rocky relationship.

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Information from: Star Tribune, http://www.startribune.com

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Wednesday, July 11, 2012 --- 3:25 p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- Authorities say a man suspected of killing his three young daughters called their mother out of the blue and asked to seem them.

Police found the girls dead in their mother's River Falls house on Tuesday.

Aaron Schaffhausen, 34, has been arrested in connection with the deaths. Formal charges are pending.

Police said at a news conference Wednesday that Schaffhausen and his wife were divorced and he lives in Minot, North Dakota.

They said he contacted his ex-wife Tuesday and asked for an unplanned visit with the girls. The mother gave her permission, Schaffhausen showed up at the home and the girls' baby-sitter left.

Police say the father later called his ex-wife and told her he had harmed the children.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Wednesday, July 11, 2012 --- 1:27 p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- Neighbors are remembering the three young sisters found dead in a River Falls house as "normal, happy girls."

Heather Johnson lives a few doors down from the house where the girls' bodies were found Tuesday. Johnson says her son would ride bikes, skateboard and play at a neighborhood park with the girls, who she says were "cute, sweet little girls."

Authorities on Wednesday identified the victims as 11-year-old Amara, 8-year-old Sophie and 5-year-old Cecilia Schaffhausen. Their father is being held on possible charges of first-degree intentional homicide.

Police said they could smell gas when they went to check on the girls at the direction of their mother. But, they provided no details on how the children died. Their parents are divorced.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Wednesday, July 11, 2012 --- 9:25 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- A vigil is planned Wednesday night for the three young sisters found dead in their home in River Falls.

Julie Matzke's 7-year-old daughter was in Girl Scouts with one of the sisters. Matzke describes the girl as an energetic, beautiful, little spirit who was taken too soon. She has created a Facebook page in the girls' honor. Matzke has also set up a vigil at Glen Park in River Falls at 7 p.m.

The bodies of the girls, ages 5 to 11, were found Tuesday afternoon when police were asked by their mother to check on their welfare. Officers say there was an odor of gas when they entered the house. Their father was arrested and remains in jail pending charges.

Court records show the mother and father were divorced last year.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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UPDATED Wednesday, July 11, 2012 --- 7:15 a.m.

From WEAU-TV:

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (WEAU) -- The River Falls Police Department says three children were found dead in a home in River Falls Tuesday afternoon.

Police were called to the home on Morningside Avenue around 3:30 by the kids' mother who was concerned about their safety, after she said the father made statements about their well being.

When officers got there, they noticed the smell of gas in the home and found the bodies of three girls between the ages of five and eleven.

Police say the father, identified as 34-year old Aaron Schaffhausen, turned himself into police.

Police Chief Roger Leque says, “All of us are saddened by this tragedy. At this time, there is no danger to the greater community arising out of this incident.”

The mother of the children, who was not home at the time, is safe and is assisting police in the investigation.

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UPDATED Wednesday, July 11, 2012 --- 6:45 a.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- A father has been arrested after three young girls, believed to be his daughters, were found dead at home in a tiny western Wisconsin town.

Police said the house smelled of gas.

Authorities say the girls' mother, who was away, called River Falls police Tuesday afternoon and asked officers to check on the sisters because their father had called her and the conversation made her concerned for their safety. Court records show the couple was divorced last year.

Officers found the bodies of the children, ages 5 to 11, at their River Falls home. City administrator Scot Simpson said Wednesday the girls match the description of the couple's three children.

The 34-year-old father later turned himself in to police.

River Falls is about 30 miles east of Minneapolis-St. Paul.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.

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Posted: Tuesday, July 10, 2012 --- 8:33p.m.

RIVER FALLS, Wis. (AP) -- Police are investigating an apparent triple homicide in the western Wisconsin city of River Falls.

A news release from the city says police were dispatched about 3:30 p.m. Tuesday to a home for a domestic situation and a welfare check.

The statement says one person was taken into custody for his apparent involvement in the death of three residents at that address.

River Falls Police Chief Roger Leque says there's no danger to the rest of the community.

Several other agencies are assisting in the investigation.

Few other details were immediately released.

Copyright 2012. The Associated Press.


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