UPDATE: Ground Turkey Recall

UPDATED Saturday, August 5, 2011 --- 11:20 a.m.

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) -- An Omaha meatpacker denies supplying tainted beef to Cargill Meat Solutions Corp. that sickened dozens of people in 2007.

A statement issued Saturday by Greater Omaha Packing Company President Henry Davis says all products shipped to Cargill tested negative for E. coli.

Cargill filed a federal lawsuit Friday, saying the meatpacker supplied beef trimmings that were processed into ground beef at its Butler, Wis., plant in mid-August 2007. About 845,000 pounds of the beef was voluntarily recalled after four Minnesota children got sick from E. coli.

The lawsuit says Greater Omaha Packing violated the terms of its sales agreement with Cargill by providing bad meat.

Cargill says said the tainted meat was linked to at least a few dozen illnesses, including those in Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina and Tennessee.

Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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NOTE: For a complete list of the recalled products, click on the link ABOVE [marked Recall Alert: Click HERE For List Of Recall Products]

NOTE: ROUNDY’S MESSAGE TO CUSTOMERS:

As you have heard in the news, Cargill has initiated a voluntary recall of its ground turkey products over a recent salmonella outbreak.

We have confirmed that none of the ground turkey products in any of our Pick ’n Save, Copps, Rainbow, Mariano’s Fresh Market, or Metro Market stores carry product from Cargill and are not affected by this recall.

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UPDATED: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 --- 5:36p.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Agriculture Department says meat giant Cargill is recalling 36 million pounds of ground turkey linked to a death in California and at least 76 other salmonella illnesses.

Illnesses in the outbreak date back to March and have been reported in 26 states coast to coast.

Government officials say that even contaminated ground turkey is safe to eat if it is cooked to 165 degrees and handled properly before cooking.

Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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UPDATED Tuesday, August 2, 2011 --- 3:30 p.m.

Wis residents with salmonella poisoning are better

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The state health department says the three Wisconsin residents with salmonella poisoning connected to a national outbreak possibly involving ground turkey have recovered.

The two adults and one infant live in Dane, Kenosha and Milwaukee counties.

State Department of Health Services spokeswoman Beth Kaplan says one person was hospitalized but all have recovered. They were sick between April and early June.

Only one had exposure to ground turkey. Kaplan says all are linked because they had the same strain of salmonella that has sickened 73 others in 26 states altogether.

One person has died but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released no details about the death.

The government is still investigating who produced the meat and has not initiated a recall.

Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.

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Posted: Friday, July 29, 2011 --- 6:43 p.m.

WASHINGTON, July 29, 2011 --The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is issuing a public health alert due to concerns about illnesses caused by Salmonella Heidelberg that may be associated with use and consumption of ground turkey.

Recommendations for Preventing Salmonellosis:

USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline
1-888-MPHOTLINE or visit
www.fsis.usda.gov

Wash hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat and poultry. Also wash cutting boards, dishes and utensils with hot soapy water. Clean up spills right away.

Keep raw meat, fish and poultry away from other food that will not be cooked. Use separate cutting boards for raw meat, poultry and egg products and cooked foods.

Cook raw meat and poultry to safe internal temperatures before eating. The safe internal temperature for meat such as ground beef and pork is 160º F, and 165º F for poultry, as determined with a food thermometer.

Refrigerate raw meat and poultry within two hours after purchase (one hour if temperatures exceed 90º F). Refrigerate cooked meat and poultry within two hours after cooking.

This public health alert was initiated after continuous medical reports, on-going investigations and testing conducted by various departments of health across the nation determined there is an association between consumption of ground turkey products and an estimated 77 illnesses reported in 26 states. The illnesses were linked through an epidemiologic investigation and PFGE analyses by state health departments and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

CDC is partnering with state health departments to monitor the outbreak while FSIS focuses its investigation on potential identification of a contamination source(s).
FSIS reminds consumers of the critical importance of following package cooking instructions for frozen or fresh ground turkey products and general food safety guidelines when handling and preparing any raw meat or poultry. In particular, while cooking instructions may give a specific number of minutes of cooking for each side of the patty in order to attain 165 °F internal temperature, consumers should be aware that actual time may vary depending on the cooking method (broiling, frying, or grilling) and the temperature of the product (chilled versus frozen) so it is important that the final temperature of 165 °F must be reached for safety. Please do not rely on the cooking time for each side of the patty, but use a food thermometer.

Ground turkey and ground turkey dishes should always be cooked to 165 °F internal temperature as measured with a food thermometer; leftovers also should be reheated to 165 °F. The color of cooked poultry is not always a sure sign of its safety. Only by using a food thermometer can one accurately determine that poultry has reached a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 °F throughout the product. Turkey can remain pink even after cooking to a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 °F. The meat of smoked turkey is always pink.

Consumption of food contaminated with Salmonella can cause salmonellosis, one of the most common bacterial foodborne illnesses. Salmonella infections can be life-threatening, especially to those with weak immune systems, such as infants, the elderly and persons with HIV infection or undergoing chemotherapy. The most common symptoms of salmonellosis are diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within eight to 72 hours. Additional symptoms may be chills, headache, nausea and vomiting that can last up to seven days.

Consumers with food safety questions can “Ask Karen,” the FSIS virtual representative available 24 hours a day at AskKaren.gov. The toll-free USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) is available in English and Spanish and can be reached from l0 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Eastern Time) Monday through Friday. Recorded food safety messages are available 24 hours a day.


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