NBC15 WMTV | Madison, WI | News

UPDATE: Wis. committee cancels vote on Common Core changes

UPDATED Thursday, February 20, 2014 --- 9:30 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The state Assembly's Education Committee has canceled a vote on a bill that would give the ultimate authority over writing academic standards for Wisconsin's public schools to the state Legislature.

The committee had planned to vote on the bill Thursday, just two days after it was introduced.

But committee chairman Rep. Steve Kestell says due to confusion and misinformation, and because changes may be forthcoming, the vote was delayed indefinitely.

Kestell says the committee won't vote on it this week.

State Superintendent Tony Evers has voiced loud disapproval of the bill, saying politicians should not be put in control of approving standards.

Republican Gov. Scott Walker says he supports it and believes the panel created to draft standards would reach agreement so the Legislature would not have to step in.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

____________________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, February 20, 2014 --- 8:04 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A bill that would give the ultimate authority over writing academic standards for Wisconsin's public schools to the state Legislature is scheduled for a committee vote.

The Assembly Education Committee planned to vote Thursday on the measure, which is moving quickly through the Legislature as the session nears an end.

State Superintendent Tony Evers has voiced loud disapproval of the bill, which was just introduced on Tuesday and scheduled for a committee vote two days later. He says politicians should not be put in control of approving standards.

But Republican Gov. Scott Walker says he supports the bill and believes the panel created to draft standards would reach agreement so the Legislature would not have to step in.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

______________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, February 19, 2014 --- 9:56 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker supports a proposal being rushed through the Legislature that would lead to the undoing of statewide Common Core academic standards and instead give the Legislature the power to approve new standards.

The state Assembly Education Committee plans to vote on the Republican-sponsored measure on Thursday. But the Wisconsin State Journal reports Wednesday (http://tiny.cc/pj7ibx ) that state Superintendent Tony Evers is fighting the change, calling it "wholly unacceptable."

Evers says the proposal would politicize the process of writing standards for education in Wisconsin.

The bill would also call for creation of a new statewide test to measure how well students are meeting the standards. That would replace a test scheduled to be given next year that's aligned to the Common Core standards.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

________________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, February 12, 2014 --- 2:57 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Assembly's Education Committee has passed a bill designed to protect student data.

The Wednesday 6-5 vote came on a measure that grew out of a task force that examined the effect of Common Core academic standards in public schools.

The bill would impose restrictions on the state Department of Public Instruction and any private entity that collects student data. All four committee Democrats and Republican Rep. Steve Nass voted against passage, with the six other Republicans supporting it.

The committee was originally scheduled to also vote on a bill that banned the collection of biometric data from students, like fingerprints and eye scans, but that was removed because changes are still being discussed.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

_________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, February 12, 2014 --- 11:00 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Assembly's Education Committee has deadlocked on passing a bill designed to protect student data.

The Wednesday vote to pass the bill tied at 5-5, meaning it cannot advance. One member, Republican Rep. Jessie Rodriguez, was absent but could vote later.

The measure grew out of a task force that examined the effect of Common Core academic standards in public schools.

The bill would impose restrictions on the state Department of Public Instruction and any private entity that collects student data. All four committee Democrats and Republican Rep. Steve Nass voted against passage.

The committee was originally scheduled to also vote on a bill that banned the collection of biometric data from students, like fingerprints and eye scans, but that was removed because changes are still being discussed.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

_______________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, February 12, 2014 --- 9:28 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin Assembly's Education Committee plans to vote on a pair of bills that grew out of a task force that examined the effect of Common Core academic standards in public schools.

The bills up for a vote Wednesday are designed to protect student privacy, but Democrats and the state Department of Public Instruction oppose them.

One bill would prohibit the collection of any biometric data, including scans of a student's pupil and fingerprints. The standards do not require the taking of biometric data, but bill backers argue they need to take action before any attempts are made.

The second bill would direct DPI to post on its website a comprehensive list of every distinct type of data that it collects on individual students and the reason for its collection.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

___________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, February 3, 2014 --- 10:54 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The Wisconsin state chamber of commerce is speaking out in support of Common Core academic standards that have drawn fire from some conservatives in the state Legislature and calls for changes from Gov. Scott Walker.

Jim Morgan, president of the educational division of Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce, issued a statement Monday saying the standards "have given local communities a common purpose, the states a common goal and our country a tool to ensure our long-term success."

Walker last month said he will back legislation creating a commission to review and recommend changes to the standards, hoping that the outcome will be tougher than the Common Core.

But Morgan says in the statement that the Common Core standards make "common sense for Wisconsin's school districts."

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

___________________________________________

UPDATED Friday, January 24, 2014 --- 11:30 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker says he would like to form a commission to review academic standards in Wisconsin.

Walker spoke Friday in Milwaukee to members of Wisconsin school boards.

He says he wants high standards for schools but believes people in Wisconsin should have input on those standards.

Wisconsin currently adheres to Common Core academic standards for math and reading. The standards in place in 45 states were adopted here in 2010.

Walker says he will propose forming a commission with members appointed by him, state schools Superintendent Tony Evers and the legislature. The commission would review the Common Core standards and make suggestions for changes to Evers' office, which would devise new rules to guide schools.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

______________________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, January 16, 2014 --- 12:47 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin state senators looking into the Common Core academic standards in Wisconsin are discussing possible changes, but not voting on specific recommendations.

The special committee that studied the standards met Thursday. Chairman Sen. Paul Farrow, a Republican from the village of Pewaukee, says he will be submitting a final report incorporating ideas of committee members soon.

One committee member, Republican Sen. Leah Vukmir of Brookfield, wants to repeal the standards adopted in 2010 that cover what public school students should know in the areas of math and English.

Democratic Sen. John Lehman, of Racine, says Republicans on the panel have been distorting the truth and incorrectly portraying the standards as part of a federal conspiracy.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

______________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, January 15, 2014 --- 1:06 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- An assistant Wisconsin state superintendent says revising academic standards every six years would create legal, technical and other issues that make a Republican-backed proposal to do that unworkable.

Assistant superintendent Sheila Briggs testified against the bill before the Assembly Education Committee on Wednesday.

The Common Core standards covering math and English were adopted in 2010 in Wisconsin by state Superintendent Tony Evers.

Republican Rep. Dean Knudson says the Department of Public Instruction was wrong not to engage the public and Legislature before adopting the standards.

His bill would require a review of academic standards every six years. DPI also be charged with creating model academic standards in regular and advanced math, English, science, social studies and the arts.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

_____________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, January 15, 2014 --- 11:31 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Critics of Common Core academic standards are pushing for changes they say will protect student privacy and require more public input on the drafting of any new standards covering what Wisconsin students should know.

The Assembly Education Committee considered three bills Wednesday related to the standards.

The bills would require public input and review of academic standards, protect student privacy, and ban the collection of biometric data including fingerprints and retinal scans.

Republican Rep. Dean Knudson, of Hudson, is sponsoring a bill that would require the state Department of Public Instruction to hold public hearings across the state and create new standards that the Legislature would review every six years.

Knudson says the "status quo is not working and the Legislature needs to act."

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

_________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, January 15, 2014 --- 5:45 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Three bills that grew out of a task force studying the Common Core academic standards are slated for a public hearing in the Wisconsin state Assembly.

While the Republican-sponsored bills are getting a hearing Wednesday before the Assembly Education Committee, they may run into trouble in the Senate. Republican Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald said last month that any Common Core bill will have a difficult time passing in the Senate.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos has promised that the bills up for a hearing will be voted on by the full Assembly in February.

The bills are designed to protect student privacy, ban the collection of biometric data including fingerprints and retinal scans, and require public input and review of academic standards.

Copyright 2014: Associated Press

____________________________________________

UPDATED Friday, December 27, 2013 --- 12:46 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The leader of the Wisconsin state Senate says it will be difficult getting enough votes to make any changes to the Common Core academic standards that many conservatives are calling to be repealed.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald tells The Associated Press that a package of bills introduced in the Assembly dealing with Common Core is unlikely to come up in the Senate.

Fitzgerald said Friday the only idea that may be voted on is increasing legislative oversight of academic standards.

But he says others like one that bans the collection of biometric data like fingerprints and retinal scans don't have the votes to pass in the Senate.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos has said all of the bills will pass the Assembly in February.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

______________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, December 24, 2013 --- 8:37 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The state Assembly plans to vote in February on bills that are being circulated in response to recommendations of a task force that studied the Common Core academic standards in place in Wisconsin.

One would bar retinal scans, fingerprinting and the taking of other biometric data from Wisconsin public school students.

Another bill would require periodic reviews of the Common Core standards in math and English as well as the creation of new standards in other subjects, with a series of public meetings for input.

And a third would require additional public hearings on the standards.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos says the bills will be voted on in February.

The standards were adopted in 2010 but have come under criticism largely from conservative Republicans.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

_____________________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, December 12, 2013 --- 11:22 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Democrats are speaking out against recommendations of a Republican-led committee that reviewed Common Core academic standards in Wisconsin.

The committee was meeting Thursday to vote on recommendations that call for additional legislative review and restrictions under the standards, which were adopted in 2010.

But Democratic Rep. Sondy Pope says many of the concerns raised are unrealistic. She says, "I just feel like through this process I should be watching for some boogeyman or black helicopter that may be hovering around."

Republicans say they are concerned about protecting student privacy and preventing the state from taking biometric data from them like fingerprints and retinal scans.

The panel's recommendations are expected to lead to a variety of legislative bills to be considered next year.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

_______________________________________________

UPDATED Wednesday, December 11, 2013 --- 10:10 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A Republican-led state Assembly committee called together to study the Common Core academic standards in Wisconsin is not recommending they be scrapped, despite pressure from tea party conservatives to do just that.

Instead, recommendations released by the committee on Wednesday call for establishing a process for the continued review and adoption of standards that involves legislative control and public comment.

The English and math standards were adopted in 2010 by Department of Public Instruction Secretary Tony Evers. The voluntary standards are in place in 45 states and are viewed by Evers and many in the education community as setting a more rigorous standard for students to meet.

The committee says that Wisconsin is best-served by creating state-based standards, but does not call for that to be done.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

______________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, December 10, 2013 --- 3:27 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Responses from nearly 100 school superintendents across Wisconsin with their feelings about the Common Core academic standards have been released by a legislative committee.

The special panel created by Republicans to study the standards released results of the four-question survey on Tuesday. The committee is expected to release its recommendations related to the Common Core curriculum on Wednesday and vote on it Thursday.

The survey was sent to all 426 public school districts in Wisconsin and 94 superintendents responded. Their comments can be seen here: http://tiny.cc/9law7w

Many superintendents expressed their support for the standards, which they said are more rigorous than what was in place previously. Tea party conservatives pushed for the review of the standards amid concerns that they were too weak and amount to a nationwide curriculum.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

_________________________________________

UPDATED Monday, December 9, 2013 --- 5:10 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A report on recommendations for changes to the Common Core education standards in place in Wisconsin is scheduled to be released and voted on this week.

A special Assembly committee created by Republicans earlier this year to study the standards plans to release its report on Wednesday and then vote on it Thursday.

Tea party conservatives have been loudly criticizing the standards that are designed to improve instruction in math and English. Critics say the standards are weak, creating a national curriculum and the government is collecting too much information about students.

But backers say the voluntary standards in place in 45 states are a vast improvement over what Wisconsin previously had and that concerns are overblown.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

_____________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, November 25, 2013 --- 11:22 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Dozens of conservatives and leaders of tea party groups from across Wisconsin are urging Gov. Scott Walker to "be the hero" and "boldly" reject Common Core education standards.

The letter delivered Tuesday to Walker comes after Assembly Republicans who studied the standards indicated they were not interested in abandoning them.

The voluntary standards cover English and math instruction and were adopted in Wisconsin three years ago.

The goal of the standards is to improve instruction and better prepare students for life after school. But critics, many of them conservative Republicans, say the standards are too weak and amount to the federal government creating a national curriculum.

Walker has said he would like to see Wisconsin adopt tougher standards. The letter urges him to completely reject the current standards.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

____________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, November 19, 2013 --- 2:11 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- State lawmakers who held a series of public hearings on the Common Core academic standards are showing little interest in attempting to undo those standards.

Instead, Republicans who control the Assembly committee said Tuesday they would like to see more done to protect student privacy, craft the standards into something unique for Wisconsin and review them periodically.

A report with lawmakers' recommendations is expected to be done by the end of the year.

The voluntary academic standards for math and English are in place in 45 states. They were adopted in Wisconsin in 2010 and are defended by backers as a more rigorous curriculum for students.

But opponents say the standards infringe upon the ability of local school districts to decide what they want to teach.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

______________________________________________

UPDATED Tuesday, November 19, 2013 --- 10:28 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- State lawmakers who held a series of public hearings on the Common Core academic standards are readying reports with their thoughts and possible recommendations for change.

The Assembly committee planned a Tuesday meeting to discuss the final report. The Senate committee is also preparing a report that could be released later this week.

The voluntary academic standards for math and English are in place in 45 states. They were adopted in Wisconsin in 2010 and are defended by backers as a more rigorous curriculum for students.

But opponents say the standards infringe upon the ability of local school districts to decide what they want to teach.

Testimony was gathered at hearings in Madison, Fond du Lac, Eau Claire and Wausau this fall.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

_________________________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, October 3, 2013 --- 1:30 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin's schools superintendent is defending the state's Common Core academic standards in front of a pair of Republican committees.

Tony Evers told the Senate and Assembly committees reviewing the standards that the requirements are rigorous and clear. He says they allow teachers to go deeper, prepare students for college and help students meet employers' expectations.

He called the standards a serious step forward for the state.

Wisconsin was one of the first states to adopt the voluntary national standards. Conservatives, though, fear the standards trump local control and the federal government is using them to gather students' personal information.

Tea party members sent lawmakers a letter calling for an investigation into the standards. The Republican-controlled Legislature responded by creating Senate and Assembly study committees. Republican Gov. Scott Walker says he wants tougher standards than Common Core.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

__________________________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, October 3, 2013 --- 11:54 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Two legislative committees are set to hold a public hearing on Wisconsin's Common Core academic standards.

Wisconsin was one of the first states to adopt the voluntary national standards. Criticism from conservatives has been mounting, however. They fear the standards are creating a loss of local control and the federal government is using the standards to gather students' personal information.

Tea party members sent lawmakers a letter earlier this year calling for an investigation into the standards. The Republican-controlled Legislature responded by creating Senate and Assembly study committees. Both panels have scheduled a joint hearing on the standards for Thursday in the state Capitol.

Wisconsin schools Superintendent Tony Evers defended the standards before the hearing, saying the state can't pull the rug out from under thousands of teachers and students.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

_______________________________________

UPDATED Thursday, October 3, 2013 --- 10:09 a.m.
Posted Thursday, October 3, 2013 --- 6:50 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Two legislative committees are set to hold a public hearing on Wisconsin's Common Core academic standards.

Wisconsin was one of the first states to adopt the voluntary national standards. Criticism from conservatives has been mounting, however. They fear the standards are creating a loss of local control and the federal government is using the standards to gather students' personal information.

Tea party members sent lawmakers a letter earlier this year calling for an investigation into the standards. The Republican-controlled Legislature responded by creating Senate and Assembly study committees. Both panels have scheduled a joint hearing on the standards for Thursday in the state Capitol.

The School Administrators Alliance plans to hold a news conference with state schools Superintendent Tony Evers ahead of the hearing to support the standards.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
NBC15 615 Forward Drive Madison, Wisconsin 53711 Business: 608-274-1515 Newsroom: 608-274-1500
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 226282901