UPDATE: Walker Has No Problem with New Residency Rule

UPDATED Tuesday, May 14, 2013 --- 10:57 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker says he has no problems with a new residency requirement added to the state budget by the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee.

Walker had proposed in his budget eliminating any residency requirements statewide. But the committee last week revised that, requiring public safety workers to live within 15 miles of the city or jurisdiction where they work.

Walker said Tuesday it is reasonable to impose restrictions based on the type of work a person does, but not if it's arbitrary.

The change affects more than 100 Wisconsin cities, but the biggest impact is in Milwaukee where all teachers and public workers are required to live within city limits. City officials and others have warned that removing the requirement will hurt Milwaukee's economy.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Thursday, May 9, 2013 --- 1:55 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- There is no deal yet on whether to eliminate any requirements that Wisconsin municipal workers live in the cities where they work.

The budget-writing Joint Finance Committee planned to vote on the issue Thursday. But committee co-chair Rep. John Nygren says a deal remains a "work in progress."

Gov. Scott Walker proposed eliminating any requirements statewide. But opponents say it was primarily targeting Milwaukee, which requires all city and school district employees to live in the city.

Nygren said Wednesday a deal was being floated to allow employees to live a certain distance outside the city boundaries, but face a penalty if they do.

Budget committee co-chair Sen. Alberta Darling says senators oppose the penalty part, but agree with setting an allowable radius in which workers can live.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, May 8, 2013 --- 2:24 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A compromise to Gov. Scott Walker's proposal eliminating a residency requirement for public workers statewide is being discussed in the Legislature.

Rep. John Nygren said Wednesday the deal would require public workers to live within a certain distance from the municipality where they work or face a financial penalty.

He says the allowable distance as well as the level of financial penalty is still being negotiated. Nygren says the deal is a "work in progress."

Nygren is co-chair of the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee. It is scheduled to vote Thursday on Walker's proposal to eliminate the residency requirement.

The mayors of Milwaukee and Madison along with other local officials spoke out Wednesday at the Capitol in support of keeping the residency requirement.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, May 8, 2013 --- 10:57 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The mayors from Wisconsin's two largest cities, along with other local officials from around the state, are calling on the Legislature to reject Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to remove a residency requirement for public workers.

The Capitol news conference Wednesday came a day before the Legislature's budget committee planned to vote on Walker's plan removing the residency requirement statewide. More than 100 municipalities in Wisconsin, including Milwaukee and Madison, have some sort of residency requirement.

But Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett says the proposal is targeted at Milwaukee and the other affected communities are just "innocent bystanders."

Barrett says the measure is payback to Milwaukee police and firefighter unions that supported Walker.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Posted, Wednesday May 8, 2013 -- 8:52 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The mayors from Wisconsin's two largest cities, along with other local officials from around the state, are planning to join together to speak out against removing a residency law for public workers.

The local leaders scheduled a Wednesday news conference in the state Capitol on the issue.

It comes a day before the Legislature's budget committee planned to vote on Gov. Scott Walker's plan removing the residency requirement statewide. More than 100 municipalities in Wisconsin, including Milwaukee and Madison, have some sort of residency requirement.

Walker's budget would not require public workers anywhere in the state to live in the jurisdiction where they are employed.

In addition to Madison and Milwaukee's mayors, others from Beloit, Two Rivers and Marathon City plan to speak out against the change.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press


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