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Madison-area parents have hard conversations with children about Texas tragedy

Parents said they were more apprehensive dropping children off at school on Wednesday
Increased police officer patrols prompted tough conversations between parents and their young children following Tuesday’s school shooting in Texas.
Published: May. 25, 2022 at 7:27 PM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) - Increased police officer patrols prompted tough conversations between parents and their young children following Tuesday’s school shooting in Texas.

Katrina Boyd is a mother of two who said it was important to talk about Tuesday’s school shooting in Uvalde, Texas, with her daughters so they understood why there could be more police officers present at their schools on Wednesday.

”To look into their little faces and to have them say, ‘Why would someone do that?’ And I’m facing the same questions 30 or 40 years older than they are and I have no clue,” Boyd said. “It’s just gut wrenching when I think about the fact that that could’ve been my kids.”

She said she cried and hugged her 9 and 11 year old’s tighter on Wednesday before sending them off to their Middleton-Cross Plains Area schools.

Karley Carpenter, another Madison area mother, also said she would have harder conversations with her 6 and 8 year old’s.

”It’s always terrifying to think that that could’ve happened here. Especially with how many died,” Carpenter said. “To think it could’ve been my children is extremely terrifying.”

Madison Police Department Chief Shon Barnes said his officers will patrol schools more frequently until further notice. He said they are not deploying extra officers.

The chief said he is tired of seeing more and more of these shootings happen across the United States. He said elected officials should care more about people and less about power, but the blame cannot be placed on one group of people.

”But we have to do it together,” Chief Barnes said. “It’s not about the blame game, politics and it’s not about power. It’s about doing the right thing so that parents don’t have to get calls that their children were killed at school. The one place that should be off limits.”

Carpenter said the school staff is doing the best they can and she plans to reinforce school safety plans with her children at home.

”Especially thinking of my children going through that,” she said. “I would really want them to be more prepared and maybe myself talk to them more if something were to happen.”

Nineteen children and two adults lost their lives in Tuesday’s shooting massacre.

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