Democrats push Milwaukee convention into August

By  | 

MILWAUKEE, Wis. (WMTV) -- The Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee this summer is being pushed back to August.

WITI

The Convention Committee made the announcement Thursday morning in a statement saying the convention, where Democrats will anoint their presidential nominee, will be held during the week of August 17.

In a statement announcing the move, DNCC CEO Joe Solmonese explained the later date will allow organizers more time to determine how best to hold the convention.

"During this critical time, when the scope and scale of the pandemic and its impact remain unknown, we will continue to monitor the situation and follow the advice of health care professionals and emergency responders,” he said.

That puts it just a week before Republicans hold their own convention in Charlotte, North Carolina. The DNCC did not say if the convention would still run for four days, as previous scheduled.

Democrats say they have confirmed with Fiserv Forum officials that the arena will be available on those new dates, and local businesses to ensure hotel accommodations will be available.

Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett called the decision "really good news, at a time when we need some really good news."

“This is not on the front burner, and it shouldn’t be on the front burner, but let’s hope by August life is back to normal for every one of us," he continued.

Pointing out the Milwaukee is beautiful in August, Barrett added that convention-goers will still be able to come and have a good time.

Democratic presidential front-runner Joe Biden said in an interview Wednesday with late-night comedian Jimmy Kimmel that he thought his party's nominating convention would have to be pushed back from July into August because of coronavirus.

Biden noted in a separate interview Tuesday that Democrats "have more time" to figure things out. Republicans are expressing confidence they can pull off their convention as scheduled in late August.

But party Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel still allows for the possibility the pandemic could upend GOP plans.