Soglin, Rhodes-Conway take top two spots in mayoral primary results

By  | 

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) -- Several Madison mayoral candidates hoped to finish in at least second place on election night.

Current Mayor of Madison Paul Soglin and challenger Satya Rhodes-Conway finished with the first and second most votes respectively and will move on to the spring election on April 2.

With 144 of 144 precincts reporting, Soglin had 29 percent with 10,771 votes and Rhodes-Conway had 28 percent with 10,448 votes

Soglin, Rhodes-Conway, Maurice Cheeks, Raj Shukla and Nick Hart and were on the ballot Tuesday. Toriana Pettaway was not on the ballot, but was at the final forum Saturday night.

You can follow the election results for the entire ballot here.

Soglin has occupied office longer than anyone in the city, and is seeking his ninth term. In his campaign he said he wanted to build a stronger Madison, a more diverse city government and wants bus rapid transit.

“I’m pretty excited we had a great day, I think the city is looking for change and I’m hoping to be able to do that,” Rhodes-Conway said. “I respect Mayor Soglin and I hope he respects me — may the best woman win.”

Maurice "Mo" Cheeks received the third most votes with 23% of the vote. At Hawk's Bar and Grill on State Street, Cheeks encouraged his supporters not to give up, and to keep moving Madison forward.

"Obviously this wasn’t the outcome that we were looking for, but I was excited to share an evening with my supporters as we have fought hard for a future for Madison that advances what’s possible for our city," he said. "We’re all going to continue to find opportunities to roll up our sleeves and work to make this city a place that works better for all people. It’s an important time in the history of Madison, and it’s been an honor to run this race.”

Cheeks is the Alder for District 10, and said he looks forward to closing out the remainder of his term as alder "strong," and getting back to tutoring in schools.

Cheeks' campaign points included fighting inequality in Madison, as well as increasing opportunities for mentoring and tutoring programs in the city.