UPDATE: Bradley's romantic relationship became issue in 2005 case

UPDATED: Thursday, March 10, 2016 --- 5:31 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley is dealing with another negative headline in her campaign for a 10-year term on the high court.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports Bradley had a romantic relationship with a former co-worker and went on to represent the man in his child custody case in 2004-05. The man's ex-wife tried to get Bradley thrown off the case, arguing she had a conflict of interest, but a judge sided with Bradley.

At the time of her relationship with J. Andrew Bednall, Bradley was married but separated from her husband.

Gov. Scott Walker appointed Bradley to the Supreme Court last year. Bradley's attorney told the Journal Sentinel she didn't tell Walker about the case.

The attorney, Dan Kelly, called the case a "non-event" and "a nothing."

Copyright 2016: Associated Press
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UPDATED Wednesday, March 9, 2016---12:48 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Appeals Court Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg is criticizing state Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley over anti-gay opinion pieces Bradley wrote as a college student nearly 25 years ago.

Kloppenburg said Wednesday at a candidates' forum in downtown Milwaukee that Bradley's career hasn't shown evidence of change.

Bradley repeated her apology for the opinions and said that her views are different today thanks to a "mosaic of life experiences."

The candidates are running for a 10-year position on the Wisconsin Supreme Court.

A liberal group, One Wisconsin Now, has released a series of writings from Bradley. In the latest piece to be released on Wednesday, a 1992 column in the Marquette University student magazine, Bradley supported writer and critic Camille Paglia's suggestion that women play a role in date rape.

Copyright 2016: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, March 9, 2016---9:48 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley wrote in a 1992 column that writer and critic Camille Paglia legitimately suggested women play a role in date rape.

Bradley, who is running for a full 10-year term on the court, wrote the column for Marquette University's student magazine while a student there. It's the latest of Bradley's old writings to surface this week, following others that included anti-gay comments.

The liberal group One Wisconsin Now released the latest column Wednesday. In it, Bradley says she intends to expose the feminist movement as largely composed of angry, militant, man-hating lesbians who abhor the traditional family.

Bradley has apologized several times this week for her other writings. Her campaign didn't immediately respond to a request for comment on the anti-feminism column.

Copyright 2016: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, March 8, 2016--- 3:58 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley wrote several columns on hot-button issues while in college, not just the one deriding gay people that she's apologized for this week.

An Associated Press review of the Marquette University student newspaper on Tuesday uncovered columns by Bradley where she defends the school's Warriors mascot and criticizes political correctness as a "frightening trend."

She wrote in April 1992 that "The PC movement is entirely the agenda of feminists, gays, liberal extremists and 1960s radicals who never left school and consequently are largely ignorant of the real world."

And in a May 1990 column defending the mascot, Bradley wrote that the "American Indian population at Marquette should feel privileged to represent our school."

The mascot changed to the Golden Eagles in 1994 due to concerns it was disrespectful to Native Americans.

Copyright 2016: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, March 8, 2016---1:33 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- An anti-gay column Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley wrote when she was a college student in 1992 drew a torrent of negative responses from fellow students at Marquette University back then.

Bradley's column criticizes newly elected president Bill Clinton and calls homosexuals "queers," comparing them to "degenerate drug addicts."

An Associated Press review of the Marquette Tribune's archives reveals the paper published 15 responses to the column, all but three criticizing it.

Self-professed liberals and conservatives alike called it brainless, bigoted, racist and homophobic. Others likened her opinions to Nazism.

Bradley has apologized repeatedly since the column was unearthed on Monday as she runs for a full 10-year term on the Supreme Court.

Wisconsin's two gay representatives in Congress are blasting state Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley for anti-gay opinion pieces she wrote as a college student 24 years ago.

U.S. Rep. Mark Pocan on Tuesday called on Bradley to meet with members of the gay community and those living with HIV/AIDS. And U.S. Sen. Tammy Baldwin sent an email to her supporters saying "hate speech has no place in our state's highest court." She says Bradley's comments raise serious questions about her fitness to serve.

Bradley has rejected calls for her to resign, and she's apologized twice in the past days, saying she no longer believes what she wrote then calling gay people "queers" and "degenerates."

Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley calls the application process she underwent to be appointed to three judicial vacancies by Gov. Scott Walker "really extensive" and "very lengthy."

Bradley did not disclose any of those times that she was a columnist for the student newspaper at Marquette University. Anti-gay opinion pieces she wrote back then have come back to haunt her as she runs for a full 10-year term on the Supreme Court.

Bradley said in an interview on WTMJ radio Tuesday that she did her best to respond to all the questions asked on the application.

Walker tells reporters that not everything a judicial applicant wrote as a student is brought up in the appointment process. He says, "we go through looking at any opinions they've written, how they've written as a lawyer, things they wrote in law school."

Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley says her views began to change almost immediately after an anti-gay column she wrote as a college student at Marquette University was published.

Bradley said in an interview Tuesday on WTMJ radio that the negative reaction to her piece calling gay people "degenerates" made her realize that her "poorly chosen words" had an effect on people.

Bradley says she's also become a "much better person" in the past 24 years, and she is deeply sorry for what she wrote.

Bradley says as a judge she has presided over adoptions to gay couples who were providing loving homes to children.

She says, "My views on these issues have changed and I am a fair and compassionate person to every person who has come before me as a judge."

Copyright 2016: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, March 8, 2016---11:59 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley says she is "deeply sorry" for anti-gay opinion pieces she wrote 24 years ago as a college student.

Bradley said in an interview Tuesday on WTMJ radio that what she wrote in 1992 referring to gays as "degenerates" and "queers" in no way reflects the person she is now.

Bradley was appointed to the state's highest court in October by Gov. Scott Walker and is running for a 10-year term in the election to be decided April 5.

Bradley says blowback she got from her writings in 1992 began changing her attitudes on the topic, which she says were also shaped by people she's met and other life experiences.

She says, "I have become a much better person that I was back then."

Copyright 2016: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, March 8, 2016---9:37 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley wrote as a college student 24 years ago that abortion is a "holocaust of our children" and equated it with murder.

The 1992 column Bradley wrote while a student at Marquette University was unveiled Tuesday by the liberal attack group One Wisconsin Now. On Monday it released three other pieces Bradley wrote where she referred to homosexuals as "queers" and "degenerates" and expressed no sympathy for AIDS victims.

Gov. Scott Walker appointed Bradley to the Supreme Court in October and she is running for a full 10-year term in the April 5 election.

Walker on Tuesday said it's irrelevant whether he would have appointed Bradley as a judge if he had known of her college writings.

Bradley has apologized for the anti-gay writings.

Copyright 2016: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, March 7, 2016---1:26 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley says she is embarrassed about anti-gay pieces she wrote as a college student and they don't reflect her worldview or current work as a judge.

But her opponent in the state Supreme Court race said Monday "there is no statute of limitations on hate."

State Appeals Court Judge JoAnne Kloppenburg says Bradley's anti-gay comments when she was a college student "are as abhorrent and disturbing today as they were in 1992 as people were dying in huge numbers from AIDS."

Gov. Scott Walker's spokeswoman says he was not aware of her comments when he appointed her as a judge three times, including to the Supreme Court.

Walker says Bradley has made it clear she no longer holds those views.

Copyright 2016: Associated Press

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UPDATED Monday, March 7, 2016---11:07 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley is apologizing for anti-gay opinion pieces she wrote when a college student 24 years ago.

The liberal group One Wisconsin Now on Monday revealed a college newspaper column and letters to the editor Bradley wrote when a student at Marquette University in 1992.

In one, Bradley compares homosexuals with drug addicts, saying they "essentially kill themselves and others through their own behavior."

In other, reacting to the election of Bill Clinton as president, she describes him as "queer-loving" and says his victory "proves that the majority of voters are either totally stupid or entirely evil."

Bradley says in a statement she is "frankly embarrassed at the content and tone of what I wrote those many years ago."

Copyright 2016: Associated Press

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Posted Monday, March 7, 2016---10:41 a.m.

MADISON, Wis.---A political watchdog group is calling for Supreme Court Justice Rebecca Bradley to resign.

At a press conference on Monday morning, One Wisconsin Now called out Bradley for articles that she wrote for the Marquette Tribune Newspaper and while attending Marquette University.

In those articles, Bradley reportedly attacks the LGBT community and people with HIV.

Bradley is facing candidate Joanne Kloppenburg in the April 5 primary.

The two are scheduled to debate on March 18 on the the UW campus.