UPDATE: Argentine Jorge Bergoglio Elected Pope

UPDATED Wednesday, March 13, 2013--10:25p.m.
MADISON--A short conclave, white smoke and a new pope emerged. "I love him already," said Elizabeth Durack, a Madison area Catholic.
"I was watching online when he came out on the balcony and my impression was of his humility and his simplicity."

Tonight, the eyes of the world are on Pope Francis, previously known as Jorge Bergoglio. He's the first to carry the name Francis and the first non-European in over a thousand years.

"Seems like a good guy," said Don Claveau, another area Catholic."The first pope from the Americas, that's pretty exciting."

Madison Bishop Robert Morlino said the new pope was a leading candidate at the last conclave.

But he also said he thinks Pope Francis looked a little surprised when he first appeared earlier today. "I think he was a little shell-shocked by all of this when he came out," he said. "He really did have the look on his face saying 'how could this be happening, I just came here to vote'."

The Bishop also gave a little insight into the Pope's selection of Francis as his name--and what that might say about how he'll lead the church. "Francis was called....to rebuild the church at a time when the church was getting lax," he said "Pope Francis, I believe is trying to tell us, first of all that he sees that there is a lot of mediocrity in the church today....and that he feels called like Francis to rebuild the church. That is to rouse the church with the special gifts that he has from the Holy Spirit, to rouse the church out of mediocrity."
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UPDATED Wednesday, March 13, 2013 --- 5:47 p.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- The election of Jorge Bergoglio as pope is a hit with some Wisconsin Catholics, who see his Argentinian roots as a hopeful sign of change.

Leonardo Campos of Milwaukee says he and his fellow Mexicans are proud to have a pope from a Spanish-speaking country. The 45-year-old says the new Pope Francis will understand the plight of the impoverished Latin Americans whose towns are overrun by drug traffickers.

At Marquette University's campus, two graduate students said they were also excited to see an Argentinian as pope.

Thirty-year-old Andrew Karls of Green Bay says the Catholic base is growing in South America so it's wise to pick a pope from there. And 24-year-old Katie Friesen of Colby, Kan., says she hopes Bergoglio is committed to restoring transparency to the Vatican.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, March 13, 2013 --- 2:53 p.m.

VATICAN CITY (AP) -- The new pope, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, who is 76, has spent nearly his entire career at home in Argentina, overseeing churches and shoe-leather priests.

The archbishop of Buenos Aires reportedly got the second-most votes after Joseph Ratzinger in the 2005 papal election, and he has long specialized in the kind of pastoral work that some say is an essential skill for the next pope.

In a lifetime of teaching and leading priests in Latin America, which has the largest share of the world's Catholics, Bergoglio has shown a keen political sensibility as well as the kind of self-effacing humility that fellow cardinals value highly.

Bergoglio is known for modernizing an Argentine church that had been among the most conservative in Latin America.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, March 13, 2013 --- 2:18 p.m.

Argentine Jorge Bergoglio has been elected pope, the first ever from the Americas and the first from outside Europe in more than a millennium.

He chose the name Pope Francis.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Wednesday, March 13, 2013 --- 1:18 p.m.

VATICAN CITY (AP) -- The Catholic church has chosen a new pope.

White smoke is billowing from the chimney of the Sistine Chapel, meaning 115 cardinals in a papal conclave have elected a new leader for the world's 1.2 billion Catholics.

The new pope is expected to appear on the balcony of St. Peter's Basilica within an hour, after a church official announces "Habemus Papum" -- "We have a pope" -- and gives the name of the new pontiff in Latin.

The conclave was called after Pope Benedict XVI resigned last month, throwing the church into turmoil and exposing deep divisions among cardinals tasked with finding a manager to clean up a corrupt Vatican bureaucracy as well as a pastor who can revive Catholicism in a time of growing secularism.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 -- 6:09 a.m.

VATICAN CITY (AP) -- Black smoke is billowing from the chimney of the Sistine Chapel, meaning Roman Catholic cardinals have not elected a pope in their second or third rounds of balloting.

Cardinals voted twice Wednesday in Michelangelo's famed frescoed chapel after a first vote Tuesday in a conclave to elect a successor to Benedict XVI, who stunned the Catholic world last month by becoming the first pope in 600 years to resign.

The conclave was called after Pope Benedict XVI resigned last month, throwing the church into turmoil and exposing deep divisions among cardinals tasked with finding a manager to clean up a corrupt Vatican bureaucracy as well as a pastor who can revive Catholicism in a time of growing secularism.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, March 12, 2013 --- 2:06 p.m.

VATICAN CITY (AP) -- Black smoke has poured from the Sistine Chapel chimney, signaling that cardinals have failed to elect a pope on their first try.

The cardinals held the first day of the conclave Tuesday deeply divided over the problems of the church and who best among them could fix them following the stunning resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. The Vatican made clear it didn't expect a winner on the first ballot.

The cardinals now return to the Vatican's Santa Marta hotel for the night. They return to the Apostolic Palace for Mass Wednesday morning and a new round of voting.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press

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Posted Tuesday, March 12, 2013 --- 1:24 p.m.

VATICAN CITY (AP) -- The heavy wooden door to the Sistine Chapel has been closed and locked, signaling the start of the conclave to elect a new pope to succeed Benedict XVI following his stunning resignation.

Monsignor Guido Marini, master of liturgical ceremonies, closed the double doors after shouting "Extra omnes," Latin for "all out," telling everyone but those taking part in the conclave to leave the frescoed hall. He then locked it.

Benedict's resignation has thrown the church into turmoil and exposed deep divisions among cardinals grappling with whether to pick a manager who can clean up the Vatican bureaucracy or a pastor who can inspire Catholics at a time of crisis.

Copyright 2013: Associated Press