UPDATE: Loosening of teacher licensure requirements to be rejected

UPDATED: Thursday, July 2, 2015

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Highly criticized teacher licensure changes that would have allowed some people without high school degrees to be licensed to teach in Wisconsin are slated to be removed from the state budget.

Republicans on the Legislature's Joint Finance Committee approved the changes in a late-night session last month. But they were calling for their removal from the budget on Thursday.

The committee had previously approved allowing anyone with a bachelor's degree to be licensed to teach in core subjects of English, math, social studies or science.

Anyone with experience in other non-core subjects, including high school drop outs, could have been certified to teach under the previously adopted motion. That, too, was to be removed.

Teachers and others had spoken out against the licensing changes when they were first added.

Copyright: Associated Press 2015

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UPDATED: Wednesday, Jun 10, 2015 -- 9:05 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- The author of a state budget provision that would allow people who lack bachelor's degrees to teach without any specialized training says she will re-draft the proposal.

Rep. Mary Czaja said she would re-write the measure to require teachers in non-core subjects to possess at least a high school diploma and limit them to working part-time.

The Irma Republican also plans to tweak the language teachers who work in core subjects such as math and English with a degree but who lack training also would be limited to working part-time.

Czaja says the measure was originally intended to help rural schools find and retain teachers. Opponents maintain the move would hurt students.

Copyright: Associated Press 2015
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UPDATED: Wednesday, June 10, 2015 --- 12:04 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Teachers, teaching students and Democratic lawmakers say approving a budget measure that would allow Wisconsin to certify teachers who don't have bachelor's degrees would hurt students.

The group presented a petition with more than 37,000 signatures opposing the measure to Gov. Scott Walker's office Wednesday. Walker hasn't said whether he would support the measure.

Under the provision, anyone with relevant experience could be licensed to teach non-core academic subjects in grades six through 12. They wouldn't need a degree or even a high school diploma to teach non-core subjects.

The measure's supporters say it was proposed to help rural schools find and retain teachers.

The state budget committee last month approved the provision. The budget must pass the Senate and Assembly, and be signed by Walker before becoming law.

Copyright: Associated Press 2015
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UPDATED: Thursday, May 28, 2015 ---4:19 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin may be the first state in the country to certify teachers who don't have bachelor's degrees under a provision put in the state budget last week.

An analysis of the proposal by an attorney for the Legislature released Thursday shows that preliminary research found no other state allows teachers without a degree in the classroom, except for career and technical education.

The proposal added to the budget last week would allow anyone with relevant experience to be licensed to teach non-core academic subjects in grades six through 12.

Anyone with a bachelor's degree could be licensed to teach in core subjects of English, math, social studies or science.

The measure is part of the budget, which must be approved by the Legislature and Gov. Scott Walker before becoming law.

Copyright: Associated Press 2015
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UPDATED Wednesday, May 20, 2015---8:13 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin schools would be able to hire people who don't have a bachelor's degree to teach subjects like math, science, technology and engineering under a proposal approved by the Legislature's budget-writing committee.

The Joint Finance Committee approved the proposal to create a new alternative track for people with real-life experience to get licensed to teach early Wednesday morning.

The proposal would require anyone with a bachelor's degree who wants to teach English, math, science, social studies or other areas to be issued a teaching license if they are determined to be proficient in their subject area and has relevant experience.

Gov. Scott Walker had proposed something similar to help plug shortfalls in high-demand areas.

Critics say those being licensed should be instructed in effective teaching methods.

Copyright 2015: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, May 19, 2015---8:46 p.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Wisconsin schools would be able to hire people who don't have a bachelor's degree to teach subjects like math, science, technology and engineering under a proposal backed by Republicans on the Legislature's budget-writing committee.

The Joint Finance Committee was expected to vote Tuesday on a proposal to create an alternative track for people with real-life experience to get licensed to teach.

The proposal would require anyone with a bachelor's degree who wants to teach English, math, science, social studies or other areas to be issued a teaching license if they are determined to be proficient in their subject area and has relevant experience.

Gov. Scott Walker had proposed something similar to help plug shortfalls in high-demand areas.

Critics say those being licensed should be instructed in effective teaching methods.

Copyright 2015: Associated Press

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UPDATED Tuesday, May 19, 2015---8:11 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to create an alternative track for people with real-life experience to get licensed to teach in Wisconsin schools is up for a committee vote.

The budget-writing Joint Finance Committee was scheduled to take up the idea on Tuesday.

Walker has defended the proposal as making more people available to teach in high-demand areas, or in rural parts of the state where it's more difficult to find licensed teachers.

Critics have said Walker's plan is faulty because it doesn't require those being licensed to have any instruction in effective teaching.

But Walker says he's trying to give a route for professionals who want to teach to take a competency test that would get them licensed and in schools quickly.

Copyright 2015: Associated Press

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Posted January 23, 2015 --- 11:35 a.m.

MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker says he's just trying to give schools more opportunities to find teachers in high-demand areas with his new proposal to create an alternative track for people with real-life experience to get licensed to teach.

Walker told public school district administrators and school board members at an annual education convention Friday that nothing in his proposal would require them to hire those teachers if they don't want to.

Critics have said Walker's plan is faulty because it doesn't require those being licensed to have any instruction in effective teaching.

But Walker says he's trying to give a route for professionals who want to teach to take a competency test that would get them licensed and in schools quickly.

Walker first released his idea Thursday.

Copyright 2015: Associated Press

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Posted Thursday, January 22, 2015 --- 10:26 a.m.

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- Gov. Scott Walker is proposing an alternative pathway for people to become licensed as teachers in Wisconsin.

Walker on Thursday announced that he is proposing that people with work experience be allowed to take a competency test to gain a teacher license. Walker's spokeswoman says the Department of Public Instruction will be charged with creating a competency exam that will allow someone with "real life experience" to gain a teacher license.

The idea will be included in Walker's two-year state budget he plans to release on Feb. 3.

A spokeswoman for the statewide teachers union, and a spokesman for DPI, did not immediately return messages seeking comment.

Copyright 2015: Associated Press